Arshin


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Arshin

 

(Turkic), an outdated measure of length which was used in a number of countries, (Bulgaria, Afghanistan, Russia, Turkey, and Iran) before the introduction of the metric system. The arshin was first used in Russia in the 16th century. Originally the arshin equaled 27 English inches; during the reign of Peter I, the length of an arshin was established at 28 inches and remained unchanged. 1 arshin = 16 vershoks = 71.12 cm.

The length of an arshin in different countries varies from 65.2 cm to 112 cm.

References in periodicals archive ?
Arshin Mal Alan is a 1913 operetta about the cloth peddler in the 1900s Shusha, who is looking for a wife.
The steps of the sight base were numbered in 200 arshin increments from a battle-sight setting of 200 arshini to a maximum range of 1,000 arshini.
Arshin Adib-Moghaddam teaches comparative politics at SOAS and is the author, most recently, of "Iran in World Politics: the Question of the Islamic Republic", which is based on extensive field research in Iran and interviews with Iranian decision-makers.
Arshin Adib-Moghaddam is the author of "Iran in World Politics: The Question of the Islamic Republic.
Arshin Adib-Moghaddam Is a lecturer in the comparative and international politics of the middle east at SOAS, London His books include Iran in World Politics: The Question of the Islamic Republic.
Arshin Adib-Moghaddam is a SOAS academic and author, most recently of Iran in World Politics: the question of the Islamic Republic.
Arshin Adib-Moghaddam teaches comparative politics at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) and is the author, most recently, of "Iran in World Politics: the Question of the Islamic Republic.
For example, a January 1741 decree on repairing the St Petersburg to Sosninska road included water drainage specifications requiring that 'both sides be dug evenly, with a width of three arshins (2.
During the invasion of the French he dug a deep pit, let his chests down into it and covered them with soil, then intentionally leaving a space of two arshins (2 ft 4 in) put the body of a dead French soldier in the pit.
The rear ladder-style sight was originally graduated in arshins, an archaic Russian measurement equal to a pace, or 2.