artefact

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artefact

, artifact
Cytology a structure seen in tissue after death, fixation, staining, etc., that is not normally present in the living tissue

artefact

or

artifact

any individual material object produced by a culture. The study of such objects is important in anthropology (see MATERIAL CULTURE). In ARCHAEOLOGY, the artefacts left behind by a society are the main means of reconstructing an account of that society.
References in periodicals archive ?
LBK artefactual data suggest that serving and consumption of food formed an important context in which identities were articulated (e.
Always first exclude artefactual causes of abnormal semen parameters.
Some dural laminae became detached from one another, keeping their shape unaltered while allowing an artefactual intradural space to develop (Figure 3).
The section on artefactual languages presents a riveting history of how writing developed and eventually came to be used for representing language.
Well beyond the scope of the present paper, future work might explore how sexual desires and fetishes, various kinds of bodily appetites, emerge as artefactual metonymies.
In order to address the issue of transgressions of sacredness by the uninitiated, the project needed a conditional engagement or encounter with the artefactual material represented.
Saturated with associative meanings, with shared cultural imagery, it is not "the frozen artefactual stuff of museum displays and cultural performances.
The town centre for Kiruna in the Arctic was one of the first of many masterplanning works in which Erskine explored urban patterns that balance community and individual, artefactual and natural.
However, cDNAs recovered at this point were considered artefactual and not relevant to the HIV life cycle.
With this distinction in place, the criticisms of Sainsbury and Tye are easily dealt with--the precision of the semantics is artefactual and does not represent any real precision in vague discourse.
However, a change in the definition of stillbirths introduced in 1987 complicated evaluation of temporal trends; the adoption of a broader definition could have introduced an artefactual increase in 1987.
Report author Mr Richard Doll said: "We conclude that the inverse relation between Alzheimer's disease and smoking reported in small retrospective studies was largely or wholly artefactual and that persistent smoking does not reduce the age specific onset rate of the disease, or of dementia in general to any substantial extent.