calcification

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Related to arterial calcification: idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy

calcification

[‚kal·sə·fə′kā·shən]
(geochemistry)
Any process of soil formation in which the soil colloids are saturated to a high degree with exchangeable calcium, thus rendering them relatively immobile and nearly neutral in reaction.
(physiology)
The deposit of calcareous matter within the tissues of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report reviews pipeline therapeutics for Arterial Calcification by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources
13 BAC was defined as accumulation of calcium in the medial layer of the peripheral arterioles, called as MAlnckeberg medial calcific sclerosis or medial arterial calcification.
73) MGP levels were found to be higher in diabetic patients, (32) with higher ucMGP levels indicating higher risks of mitral arterial calcification a trend that was contrary to that observed in nondiabetics.
Whereas low fetuin-A is associated with arterial calcification and CVD events in ESRD (69), high fetuin-A has been associated with insulin resistance (21-23) and greater risk for diabetes (24, 25).
Atherosclerosis affects the entire arterial system and therefore, given his history of ischaemic heart disease and previous abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, some degree of peripheral vascular disease and arterial calcification may be expected.
Because the term Monckeberg medial calcific sclerosis (Figure 2, C) is probably only partially accurate and because there are other forms of arterial calcification, we feel this and other nonatherosclerotic forms of arterial calcification are better described as "primary arterial calcification.
2] caused arterial calcifications and other changes that resembled human atherosclerosis.
1) The same investigators revealed in a secondary analysis of the ET arm of the WHI that patients treated with estrogen in the age group 50-59 years, when compared with placebo-treated patients, were 42-61% less likely to have significant arterial calcification (as measured by computed tomography).
1) The same investigators revealed in a secondary analysis of the ET arm of the WHI that patients treated with estrogen in the age group 50-59 years, when compared with placebo-treated patients, were 42--61% less likely to have significant arterial calcification (as measured by computed tomography).
Other research conducted by Booth and colleagues raises new questions about the role of inadequate vitamin K intake and the progression of arterial calcification, or hardening of the arteries.
Another study in Holland, involving nearly 5,000 people, found increased intake of the vitamin significantly reduced risk of dying from heart disease because it reversed effects of arterial calcification.
4) In the literature, extensive arterial calcification has been described in a patient with clas-sical POEMS syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin defects) associated with a myeloproliferative disorder.

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