catheter

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Related to arterial catheter: arterial line

catheter

Med a long slender flexible tube for inserting into a natural bodily cavity or passage for introducing or withdrawing fluid, such as urine or blood

catheter

[′kath·ə·dər]
(medicine)
A hollow, tubular device for insertion into a cavity, duct, or vessel to permit injection or withdrawal of fluids or to establish patency of the passageway.
References in periodicals archive ?
The catheters included in this study were femoral central venous catheters, dialysis catheters, and arterial catheters for hemodynamic monitoring.
Neonatal Laboratory blood sampling: comparison of results from arterial catheters with those from an automated capillary device.
Two of the 13 were peripheral arterial catheters and the rest were peripheral venous catheters.
Inclusion criteria were individuals 18 years old and older who received physical therapy and had a femoral arterial catheter for the purpose of hemodynamic monitoring.
The conclusion of the study, which will be published in the April 2004 edition of the American Journal of Emergency Medicine, stated that the Vasotrac monitor showed a very strong statistical correlation to an invasive arterial catheter.
SAN DIEGO, March 1 /PRNewswire/ -- A new study to be published in the February 2006 issue of the Anesthesia and Analgesia shows that the non-invasive Tensys(R) T-line(R), provides continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) measurement with comparable accuracy to that of an invasive radial arterial catheter (A-line).
Primo is a handheld spot blood pressure monitoring device, which is placed on the wrist, with accuracy comparable to an invasive arterial catheter.
PULSION's core PiCCO technology can deliver cardiac output, stroke volume, cardiac volume responsiveness, systemic vascular pressure, and even extravascular lung water within ten minutes of the initial insertion of the arterial catheter.
The study, which compared readings taken with Medwave's Vasotrac non-invasive sensor-based blood pressure monitor against the "gold standard" invasive arterial catheter and a traditional oscillometric blood pressure cuff, showed that Medwave's Vasotrac monitor provided advantages over both.
The purpose of the study was to validate the use of Medwave's technology in the pediatric population by comparing the Vasotrac sensor-based, non-invasive blood pressure measurements to measurements obtained from an invasive arterial catheter, which is considered the "Gold Standard" for accuracy and frequency of measurement in blood pressure monitoring.
An invasive arterial catheter was required for blood sampling, so when the catheter was inserted, a pressure transducer was attached, and arterial blood pressure readings were initiated to verify the patient's pressure.
The study shows that the measurements obtained from the Vasotrac monitor are more than twice as likely to correlate to the arterial catheter than the measurements obtained from the automated cuff.