arthroscope


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arthroscope

[′ärth·rə‚skōp]
(medicine)
An endoscope for examining the interior of a joint.
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The 3-4 portal is the most commonly used portal for the initial placement of the arthroscope, and the 4-5 portal is the most commonly used portal for the initial insertion of probes and instruments.
In addition to Kapp Surgical's expertise in arthroscope repair, we can also offer repair of your other rigid endoscopes such as: cystoscopes, laparoscopes, hysteroscopes, sinoscopes, and endoscopic instruments.
Arthroscopes are thin, flexible fiberoptic tubes with cameras or viewing devices that are inserted into joints during keyhole surgery.
Arthroplasty and Sport Arthroscope, Orthopedics Department, Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
Arthroscopy--which is commonly utilized for the shoulder and knee joints--is performed through keyhole surgery, during which an instrument called an arthroscope is introduced into the problem joint via a small incision.
Arthroscopy (also called arthroscopic surgery) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure on a joint in which an examination and sometimes treatment of damage is performed using an arthroscope, an endoscope that is inserted into the joint through a small incision.
The equipment used for cavity inspection included a flexible colonoscope with a diameter of 10mm and angles up to 180[degrees] (Karl Storz, Germany), a 10mm and 0[degrees] laparoscope (Karl Storz, Germany), and a 4mm and 30[degrees] arthroscope (Karl Storz, Germany); all were coupled to a laparoscopic unit composed by a LED monitor, a microcam and a xenon light source (Telepack[R], Karl Storz, Germany).
Firstly, we created a space where the arthroscope was to enter.
An arthroscope with a protecting sheath was inserted, and the hip joint was examined.
Using small incisions in the skin, the surgeon uses an arthroscope (a thin tube fitted with a light source and a camera) to examine the damage to the area and then repairs the damaged areas surgically around the shoulder joint.
Using the arthroscope, the torn portion of the meniscus is removed (resected), with the goal of leaving behind as much healthy cartilage as possible.
9 mm arthroscope, we examined the Lisfranc joint (Figure 3) and noted that the cuboid articular surface between the cuboid and the fourth metatarsal was crushed (Figure 4).