articulation

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articulation

1. Zoology
a. a joint such as that between bones or arthropod segments
b. the way in which jointed parts are connected
2. Botany the part of a plant at which natural separation occurs, such as the joint between leaf and stem

Articulation

Shapes and surfaces that have joints or segments which subdivide the area or elements; the joints or members add scale and rhythm to an otherwise plain surface.

articulation

[är‚tik·yə′lā·shən]
(anatomy)
(botany)
A joint between two parts of a plant that can separate spontaneously.
(communications)
The percentage of speech units understood correctly by a listener in a communications system; it generally applies to unrelated words, as in code messages, in distinction to intelligibility.
(control systems)
The manner and actions of joining components of a robot with connecting parts or links that allow motion.
(invertebrate zoology)
A joint between rigid parts of an animal body, such as the segments of an appendage in insects.
(physiology)
The act of enunciating speech.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding complaints about partisanship, the presidents are ordered as we would expect in the political time framework: the reconstructive and articulative presidents are the most critical, the preemptive less so, and the disjunctive least of all.
Post-scientific writing releases the literary from its longstanding obligation to oppose the scientific, to play "pseudo-" to its overarching power to collapse all articulative distinctions between "state" as a noun and "state" as a verb.
I find Hutcheon's description of the metafictional dimension of narrative as "process made visible" very apposite; and I agree with her when she suggests that when fiction puts its own premises on display, one of the important consequences is a transformation of the reader's role into one that is more articulative, creative, and indeed collaborative -- for one of the most intriguing things the reader may find in metafiction is the offer of a vastly more ample franchise in the literary contract.
The precise dynamic, other articulative, and rhythmic pointing that Pierre Monteux--in a minority--brought to the wo rk is largely absent.

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