airway

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airway

1. an air route, esp one that is fully equipped with emergency landing fields, navigational aids, etc.
2. a passage down which air travels from the nose or mouth to the lungs
3. Med a tubelike device inserted via the throat to keep open the airway of an unconscious patient

Airway

 

an approved route for regular flights of transport planes. The route is provided with maintained airfields and with the necessary ground-support equipment (radio beacons, air lane identification markers, and the like) to insure safe takeoff and landing. Civil aviation flights are generally carried out on airways. In some special cases—for instance, when servicing expeditions or rendering emergency medical assistance—flights are carried out independent of any airway. The first Soviet airway was inaugurated in 1923 between Moscow and Nizhnii Novgorod (now called Gorky). In 1968 more than 2,500 airways (with a total extent of about 500,000 km) constituted the consolidated network of the USSR Aeroflot system, linking about 3,500 cities and populated points within the country and 44 foreign countries.

airway

[′er‚wā]
(building construction)
A passage for ventilation between thermal insulation and roof boards.
(mining engineering)
A passage for air in a mine. Also known as air course.
(navigation)
A designated route of passage for aircraft.

airway

airway
A passage for ventilation between thermal insulation and roof boards.

airway

airwayclick for a larger image
Some of the legends on airways for aeronautical charts.
A control area, or a portion thereof, established in the form of a corridor (ICAO). An airway is equipped with radio navigation aids. It is a path through navigable airspace designated by the appropriate authority within which air traffic services are provided.
References in periodicals archive ?
20-23) And we know that patients with artificial airways and patients who are unconscious are candidates for prophylaxis, (5,8,9) but more evidence-based studies are needed to identify other at-risk groups in order to reduce complication rates.
Other factors, including RLD, immobility, and the complications secondary to the presence of an artificial airway, increase those risks.
Wolf et al treated 30 patients who had an abrupt onset of symptoms (including stridor and dyspnea) who were not given an artificial airway, and all 30 patients fared well.
It is also recommended not to orally feed patients immediately after artificial airway removal (Elpern, 1997).
This requires the caregiver to disconnect the circuit from the patient, interrupting ventilation, disturbing the artificial airway, exposing themselves to infectious ventilator gases, and potentially contaminating the circuit interior.
The date and reasons for the initiation of MV and mode of artificial airway were recorded.
6 Stridor, difficulty managing secretions, anxiety, cyanosis, and sitting posture are late signs of impending airway obstruction and indicate the need for an immediate artificial airway.
In the presence of increased resistance of the artificial airway due to obstruction, this driving pressure can be unexpectedly high.
In other words, there are situations in which the artificial airway is a major barrier, and situations in which it is not.
Suctioning of an artificial airway is a common procedure in critical care areas.
For patients with an artificial airway who cannot communicate, it is important to observe pain associated behaviors (movements, facial expression, postures) and physiological parameters (heart rate, blood pressure and respiratory rate).
Use your eyes and hands to inspect the artificial airway for signs of compromise or excessive dermal pressure on the surrounding tissue.