artificial harbor

artificial harbor

[¦ärd·ə¦fish·əl ′här·bər]
(civil engineering)
A harbor protected by breakwaters.
A harbor formed by dredging.
References in periodicals archive ?
This artificial harbor was used during the June 6, 1944 landings and served as a base for Allied troops.
Unknown to the Germans, the structures are to be used in creating an artificial harbor off Normandy.
Running in or through Kobe are the Shinkansen (the bullet train), the JR (Japan Railways) line, the municipal subway, Portliner and Rokkoliner (elevated light rail lines connecting central Kobe to two artificial harbor islands), and the Hankyu and Hanshin private lines.
Little of this plan was executed as intended, and Blackford details once again how the construction of the Owens Valley aqueduct, the Federally-funded construction of the new artificial harbor at San Pedro, and the first large-scale implementation of land-use zoning set Los Angeles on its path of massive decentralized growth, a story already well told in Robert Fogelson's The Fragmented Metropolis: Los Angeles, 1850-1930 (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1967).
The new facility is located in the center of Jebel Ali, a special economic zone in Dubai, and the zone has one of the world's largest artificial harbors and a giant terminal for container vessels.
Indeed, during the course of the war the Allies employed unorthodox tactics like dropping streams of tinfoil from planes to confuse enemy radar (dubbed "Window" - and an idea the Nazis later stole when bombing London in 1944), the development of miniature submarines, the construction of artificial harbors (called mulberries - an idea that Churchill first sketched out in 1917
A harbor settlement inhabited starting from 6000 years ago and apparently equipped with a fortification wall partially submerged in the sea along the shore significantly transformed in time, Limantepe is one of the oldest known artificial harbors in the Aegean Sea.
the Phoenicians began building artificial harbors to shelter their fleets and to accommodate their expanding trade network, Morhange proposes.
Several high-profile incidents have focused attention on deficiencies in the public works infrastructure of the United States that includes bridges, tunnels, highways, roads, railroads, airports, canals, dams, dikes, artificial harbors and some pipelines.