artificial language


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

artificial language

[¦ärd·ə¦fish·əl ′laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
A computer language that is specifically designed to facilitate communication in a particular field, but is not yet natural to that field; opposite of a natural language, which evolves through long usage.

artificial language

A language that has been predefined before it is ever used. Contrast with natural language.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the motivation for an artificial language was not solely scholarly--many radical Protestants, and some less-radical ones, believed that an artificial language would help to restore man to the linguistic position he had held before the Fall.
Now he has been asked to organise a high-profile opening of the EsperantoAsocio de Britio's (the British Esperanto Association) new headquarters and will be part of a new development group to market the artificial language nationally.
When the author drops the artificial language of the sociologist, both she and the reader become engaged in the community she is describing.
In the second half of the century, Bacon's suggestion materialized in the project sponsored by the Royal Society to devise an artificial language.
4 Kyodo The head of the world headquarters for Esperanto speakers is confident that the artificial language created in the late 19th century for better international communication will not die out in the coming decades.
Andras takes seriously the German definition of the poet-he is a born Dichter, a condenser of words and phrases-but at the same time he cannot trust the traditional expression of feelings; so he submits words to a semantic analysis, pares off their roots, plays with their possible ambivalences, and creates a curiously artificial language of his own.
What do you get when you combine actor William Shatner and the artificial language Esperanto?
In their research, Nadel and his colleagues played recordings of "phrases" created from an artificial language to four dozen 15-month-old infants during a learning session.
For the study, the researchers used an artificial language in a carefully controlled laboratory experiment.
Among specific topics are accounting for social factors in phonetic variability, learning the mapping from surface to underlying representations in an artificial language, a syllable-level intergestual timing model, and tongue body constriction differences in click types.
Vimmi is an artificial language designed to make study results easier to interpret, New Scientist reported.