artificial language


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artificial language

[¦ärd·ə¦fish·əl ′laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
A computer language that is specifically designed to facilitate communication in a particular field, but is not yet natural to that field; opposite of a natural language, which evolves through long usage.

artificial language

A language that has been predefined before it is ever used. Contrast with natural language.
References in periodicals archive ?
Language, mind and nature: Artificial languages in England from Bacon to Locke.
using typological data for falsifying computational models) is being increasingly implemented in the field of artificial language evolution (see e.
But the motivation for an artificial language was not solely scholarly--many radical Protestants, and some less-radical ones, believed that an artificial language would help to restore man to the linguistic position he had held before the Fall.
Finally, Thiessen & Saffran, (2003) demonstrated that by 9 months of age, English-learning infants still rely more on a trochaic stress pattern than on statistical cues when segmenting ah artificial language, which replicates the results by Johnson & Jusczyk (2001).
Furthermore, an artificial language could also be learned if it connected signs and their grammatical form changes with the simplest syllables available, and if it, at the same time, could be communicated orally.
Now he has been asked to organise a high-profile opening of the EsperantoAsocio de Britio's (the British Esperanto Association) new headquarters and will be part of a new development group to market the artificial language nationally.
When the author drops the artificial language of the sociologist, both she and the reader become engaged in the community she is describing.
In the second half of the century, Bacon's suggestion materialized in the project sponsored by the Royal Society to devise an artificial language.
4 Kyodo The head of the world headquarters for Esperanto speakers is confident that the artificial language created in the late 19th century for better international communication will not die out in the coming decades.
Andras takes seriously the German definition of the poet-he is a born Dichter, a condenser of words and phrases-but at the same time he cannot trust the traditional expression of feelings; so he submits words to a semantic analysis, pares off their roots, plays with their possible ambivalences, and creates a curiously artificial language of his own.
The first is that of Leibniz in his preliminary writings for the project of an artificial language that never saw the light of day, the Characteristica universalis; the second is that of Kleist in his famous short text Uber die allmahliche Verfertigung des Gedanken beim Reden, 1805 (On the Progressive Elaboration of Thought in Language).
Unfortunately, it never caught on, and neither has any other artificial language.