artificial sweetener


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artificial sweetener:

see sweetener, artificialsweetener, artificial,
substance used as a low-calorie sugar substitute. Saccharin, cyclamates, and aspartame have been the most commonly used artificial sweeteners. Saccharin, a coal-tar derivative three hundred times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1879.
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sweetener, artificial,

substance used as a low-calorie sugar substitute. Saccharinsaccharin
, C7H5NSO3, white, crystalline, aromatic compound. It was discovered accidentally by I. Remsen and C. Fahlberg in 1879. Pure saccharin tastes several hundred times as sweet as sugar.
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, cyclamatescyclamate
, any member of a group of salts of cyclamic acid (cyclohexanesulfamic acid). The sodium and calcium salts were commonly used as artificial sweeteners until 1969, when their use was banned by the U.S.
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, and aspartame have been the most commonly used artificial sweeteners. Saccharin, a coal-tar derivative three hundred times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1879. Cyclamates were approved for consumer use in 1951; they are 30 times sweet as sugar and, unlike saccharin. have no bitter aftertaste at high concentration. They were banned in 1969 because of suspected carcinogenic properties. Aspartame, an amino-acid compound that is about 160 times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1965 and is a widely used low-calorie sweetener. It cannot be used in cooking because it is destroyed on boiling in water. People who are sensitive to the amino acid phenylalanine should not use aspartame. Neotame, an aspartame analog, is 30 to 60 times sweeter than aspartame, more stable at high temperatures, and far less likely to pose a risk to people sensitive to phenylalanine. Sucralose, which is manufactured by adding chlorine to sugar, is not destroyed by heat and is widely used as a sweetener in packaged foods that have been baked or otherwise heated during their processing. About 600 times sweeter than sugar, it was first synthesized in 1976. Stevioside, which is 300 times as sweet as sucrose, is a terpene derivative and is available in several countries.

artificial sweetener

[¦ärd·ə¦fish·əl ′swēt·nər]
(food engineering)
A sugar substitute, such as saccharin.
References in periodicals archive ?
By disrupting the body's natural ability to count calories, artificial sweeteners can lead to people over-eating because they believe real sugar is not fattening.
II-34 Types of Sweeteners II-34 Comparison of Various Sweeteners II-34 Popular Sweeteners Artificial Sweeteners and Bulk Sweeteners and Sugar Type II-35 Bulk Sweeteners/Nutritive Sweeteners II-35 Sugars II-35 Sugar Alcohols II-35 Artificial/Non-Nutritive/Intense Sweeteners II-35 Table 23: Artificial Sweeteners - How Sweet Are They?
So the artificial sweetener was related to an enhanced blood insulin and glucose response," Pepino explained.
But there is 'limited and inconclusive' evidence that artificial sweeteners help consumers lose weight in the long run, New York Daily News reported.
Some food dyes, cyclamates and other artificial sweeteners all eventually had to be pulled from the market, but it took decades from the time the FDA approval was awarded.
These substitutes lack the intense sweetness of artificial sweeteners such as saccharin or aspartame but look and react so much like sucrose -- table sugar -- that they can replace sugar in baked goods and frozen desserts, says Hubert Schiweck, a chemist with Sudzucker.
With data tables and figures to support saccharin market analysis, this report on the specific artificial sweetener provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in the saccharin market.
You might want to discourage your patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis from using artificial sweeteners, according to investigators from Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Artificial sweeteners have long been promoted as diet and health aids.
Danish researchers randomly assigned 22 overweight adults to consume beverages (like soft drinks and fruit drinks) or foods (like yogurt and ice cream) that were sweetened with either sucrose (table sugar) or artificial sweeteners.
I wondered if it was the artificial sweetener in the drinks that was causing this.