ash fall


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ash fall

[′ash ‚fȯl]
(geology)
A fall of airborne volcanic ash from an eruption cloud; characteristic of Vulcanian eruptions. Also known as ash shower.
Volcanic ash resulting from an ash fall and lying on the ground surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ash falls from the eruptions caused damage totaling an estimated 6.
Mr Benediktsson said: " Naturally, various questions arise following such disasters concerning the effects of ash fall, potential evacuation of livestock, transportation, insurance issues and food supplies.
The evidence of high degasification, the absence of co-ignimbrite ash fall deposits and the restriction of crystals to the matrix while they're absent in pumice fragments, could signify a boiling over process, but it could also be the result of a small column collapse.
In 2002, for example, rain combined with ash fall alone caused economic losses of around US $960 million after the eruption of Mount Etna in Sicily.
At the foot of the volcano, authorities allowed some of the 1,500 people who evacuated the town of Ensenada to return temporarily to their homes to carry out belongings and clean up damage from the heavy ash fall.
Researchers used simulation software called Ash3d that forecasts ash fall by applying global wind patterns to data from historical eruptions.
85 million people in the three prefectures will be affected by the expected 2 cm or more volcanic ash fall.
The powerful earthquakes, poisonous ash fall, tsunami and disruptive weather patterns which accompanied the Thera eruption severely impacted every society in the eastern Mediterranean.
Nearby towns of Mayskoye and Kozyrevsk have been affected by volcanic ash fall, but no human casualties have been recorded
We think that, around 579 million years ago, an underwater 'nursery' of baby Ediacaran fronds was overwhelmed, Pompeii-style, by an ash fall from a volcanic eruption on a nearby island that smothered and preserved them for posterity," he added.
Roberta Hamme, a researcher with Canada's University of Victoria, suggests in a recent study published in Geophysical Research Letters that the ash fall from the eruption of Alaska's Kasatochi volcano in 2008 may be one reason for the huge 2010 run.
The ban on flights since the ash fall has large implications for employers' payroll departments.