asparagine


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Related to asparagine: aspartic acid

asparagine

(əspâr`əjēn), organic compound, one of the 20 amino acidsamino acid
, any one of a class of simple organic compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and in certain cases sulfur. These compounds are the building blocks of proteins.
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 commonly found in animal proteins. Only the l-stereoisomer participates in the biosynthesis of mammalian proteins. Its structure is identical to that of the amino acid aspartic acidaspartic acid
, organic compound, one of the 20 amino acids commonly found in animal proteins. Only the l-stereoisomer participates in the biosynthesis of proteins.
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, except that the latter compound's acidic side-chain carboxyl group has been coupled with ammonia, yielding an amide. Like glutamineglutamine
, organic compound, one of the 20 amino acids commonly found in animal proteins. Only the l-stereoisomer occurs in mammalian protein.
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, asparagine is important in the metabolism of toxic ammonia in the body. The relatively unreactive, neutral amide group in the side chain of asparagine confers no special properties upon this amino acid once it is included within a protein by two peptide bonds. Asparagine is not essential to the human diet, since it can be synthesized from aspartic acid. The first amino acid to be isolated from its natural source, asparagine was purified from asparagus juice in 1806; proof of the occurrence of this amino acid in proteins was finally obtained in 1932.

asparagine

[ə′spar·ə‚jēn]
(biochemistry)
C4H8N2O3 A white, crystalline amino acid found in many plant seeds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glutamine is a compound with the potential to form 7-member ring complexes, and this is consistent with its much lower reactivity than asparagine, the structural homolog of glutamine with 1 fewer methylene group in its sidechain and the potential to form 6-member rings.
5 mL/L) when added to the dabsylation buffer cleared the reaction mixture and also increased the recovery ratios of the amino acids, especially the hydrophilic amino acids, such as aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, serine, threonine, GABA, and glycine (Table 1).
As expected, a depletion of asparagine was observed after the GRASPA([R]) injection, regardless of the dose.
Oncaspar (pegaspargase) is the only FDA-approved PEGylated formulation of L-asparaginase, the enzyme that depletes the amino acid asparagine.
It is important to note that the determination of serum concentrations of asparagine and glutamine would also be compromised in these patients because these amino acids serve as substrates of ASNase.
When utilized as a component of induction therapy for ALL, 1 dose of ONCASPAR achieved similar levels of asparagine depletion as 9 doses of native L-asparaginase.
An important step in this direction came from findings over 40 years ago that certain cancer cells lacked enzymes necessary for the synthesis of asparagine, a non-essential amino acid for growth of normal cells.
A heterozygous mutation at codon 66 in exon 2 of the [beta]-globin gene produced a base exchange (AAA[right arrow]AAT) leading to an expected amino acid exchange from lysine to asparagine (Fig.
PATENTS RELATED TO SERINE PRODUCTS BY YEAR, 1998-2008 CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE: ASPARAGINE ASPARAGINE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY ASPARAGINE APPLICATIONS AND CONSUMPTION PATTERNS ASPARAGINE CAPACITY AND MANUFACTURERS TABLE 119 ASPARAGINE MANUFACTURERS ASPARAGINE PRICING VALUE OF U.
The nucleotide changes at positions 1397, 1407, and 1481 resulted in amino acid substitutions (with 94% identity to Malaysia, 56 of 59) from isoleucine to valine, glycine to glutamic acid, and asparagine to aspartic acid at codons 429, 432, and 457 of N protein, respectively.
5-40 kDa, depending on the amount of carbohydrate) and a higher number of asparagine (N)-linked triantennary carbohydrates and serine (O)-linked tetrasaccharide core structures in the [beta]-subunit (2).
Certain malignant cells, including many pancreatic and ovarian cell lines, lack asparagine synthetase and therefore may depend on exogenous L-asparagine to survive.

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