AST

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AST

(company)

AST

(AST Computer, Irvine, CA) A PC manufacturer founded in 1980 by Albert Wong, Safi Quershey and Tom Yuen (A, S and T). It offered a complete line of PCs that sold through its dealer channel. AST was initially known for its line of add-in memory boards for the PC, including the Rampage and SixPak Plus boards. In 1993, AST acquired Tandy Corporation's PC manufacturing facilities. In 1997, the parent company AST Research, Inc. was taken over by Samsung Electronics who struggled to revive sales and compete with known brands such as Gateway, Dell and Compaq. In January 1999, Beny Alagem, co-founder of Packard Bell, purchased the AST name and intellectual property rights for a new PC hardware venture. However, before the year was over, the once-illustrious brand ceased production altogether.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 g/L for 28 days on the activities (MeanSD) of glutamate dehydrodegase (GDH M formozan/mg protein/h) aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT M oxaloacetate/mg protein/h) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT M pyruvate/mg protein/h) of gill muscles and liver of a freshwater fish Cyprinus carpio.
Aspartate aminotransferase is found in high constitutive levels in the heart and liver, whereas alanine aminotransferase is most active in the liver.
Plasma uric acid concentrations and creatine kinase or aspartate aminotransferase activities were significantly different before versus after treatment for some groups of birds.
Blood samples were assayed for creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (markers of renal injury); and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (evidence of hepatic injury).
0 mg/L); aspartate aminotransferase, 161 IU/L (reference 13-31 IU/L); alanine aminotransferase, 83 IU/L (reference 6-27 IU/L); lactate dehydrogenase, 691 IU/L (reference119-229 IU/L); blood urea nitrogen, 3.
No associations were seen between microvesicular steatosis and lobular inflammation or levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) or alanine aminotransferase (ALT).
The variables of interest were presence of the metabolic syndrome; increased levels of fasting serum insulin, fasting plasma glucose, fasting serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT); and a decreased AST/ALT ratio.
Among the 10 patients who completed the study, reductions in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were observed in eight patients, and reduction of viral load was observed in four out of seven detectable patients.
20%) are diarrhea (70%), nausea (35%), thrombocytopenia (35%), rash (34%), increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (31%), abdominal pain (25%), and increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (23%).
Serum test results included the following: aspartate aminotransferase, 4007 U/L (reference interval, 11-47 U/L); alanine aminotransferase, 715 U/L (reference interval, 7-53 U/L); alkaline phosphatase, 67 U/L (reference interval, 38-126 U/L); lactate dehydrogenase, 6150 U/L (reference interval, 100-250 U/L); creatinine, 1.
After anesthetizing the animals on the last day, electrocardiogram was recorded and blood was analyzed for creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities.