reproductive technology

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reproductive technology

[‚rē·prə‚dək·tiv tek′näl·ə·jē]
(medicine)
Any procedure undertaken to aid in conception, intrauterine development, and birth when natural processes do not function normally.
References in periodicals archive ?
The doctor said the success rate in the assisted reproduction is good.
Opponents of IVF have long warned that the bond between mother and child will be eroded by further advances in assisted reproduction, the implication being that mothers will eschew the time and labor of traditional pregnancies once they can outsource to the lab.
Media concentration on such stories helped provoke a backlash from the majority of Catholic politicians who, working across party lines, supported the Medically Assisted Reproduction Law.
Furthermore, over the 7-year period, the success rate for IVF rose from 20% to 27%, indicating that assisted reproduction techniques are improving.
Researchers state that these results indicate a need to shift the emphasis of assisted reproduction further, away from simply achieving a pregnancy to achieving a successful outcome.
Single babies born after assisted reproduction techniques, such as IVF, had double the risk of premature birth compared with children conceived naturally, the study showed.
The latter essay also includes interesting appendices, such as a timeline detailing the development of assisted reproduction in animals and humans.
While it will cover the Church's teachings on contraception, sexuality education, assisted reproduction and homosexuality, it is intended to reach an audience of "world leaders of all faiths .
Ryan's prelude serves as a platform to state her objective: "to ask whether a just society is obliged to help people overcome infertility" (v), and to establish her "credentials" as a theologian and a woman who has been through the process of assisted reproduction.
The court noted as well that denying inheritance rights to the children would be inconsistent with the positive view of assisted reproduction expressed in state laws addressing artificial insemination of married women and insurance coverage for infertility treatments.
Instead, she refuses to back the procedure--or any of the other assisted reproduction methods being studied--until a proven safety record is established.
Ervin Jones, professor and director of assisted reproduction, explains that standard in vitro culture systems--consisting of sugars, salts, and ions--only allow two- to three-day development, resulting in four- to eight-cell embryos.

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