asterism

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asterism

A prominent grouping of stars forming a distinctive shape but not a complete or recognized constellation. The Plough is an asterism within the constellation Ursa Major. Other examples of asterisms are the Sickle in Leo, the False Cross and the Summer Triangle.

asterism

[′as·tə‚riz·əm]
(astronomy)
A constellation or small group of stars.
(optics)
A starlike optical phenomenon seen in gemstones called star stones; due to reflection of light by lustrous inclusions reduced to sharp lines of light by a domed cabochon style of cutting.
(spectroscopy)
A star-shaped pattern sometimes seen in x-ray spectrophotographs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Close to Berkeley 62, you'll find the binocular asterism Eddie's Coaster, named for Eddie Carpenter, the longtime British observer who first noticed it.
Because opposing asterisms can only be found with the help of circumpolar stars, which are always in the sky.
Among his asterisms, the Eiffel Tower (Ferrero 6) is thus named because its tapered form is reminiscent of this famous cultural icon.
The fifth star of the North Pole asterism is called 'Celestial Pivot' [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and the place nearby which lacks stars is called the Vermilion Pole [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
If this lovely asterism has a name, I haven't found it yet, so I've taken to calling it the "Fertile Crescent".
The shape of the asterism reminds me in a way of a typical Japanese fan.
This includes the background of the folk astronomical lore in the whole text of Ibn Asim with an emphasis on the 28 anwa asterisms or "lunar stations" (pp.
The densest clump of visible galaxies forms a house-like shape not unlike the asterism that underlies the constellation Cepheus.
3 degrees east of NGC 3132 is another asterism which really appeals to me and is a great pleasure to share with you.
45), he comments that the Summer Triangle asterism wasn't popularized until a little more than 50 years ago and that the famous Teapot asterism of Sagittarius is even younger.
These long-lived patterns, sometimes existing within a single constellation, sometimes built from parts of several constellations, are called asterisms.