astringent

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astringent

(əstrĭn`jənt), substance that shrinks body tissues. Astringent medicines cause shrinkage of mucous membranes or exposed tissues and are often used internally to check discharge of serum or mucous secretions in sore throat, hemorrhage, diarrhea, or peptic ulcer. Externally applied astringents, which cause mild coagulation of skin proteins, dry, harden, and protect the skin. Mildly astringent solutions are used in the relief of such minor skin irritations as those resulting from superficial cuts, allergies, insect bites, or athlete's foot. Astringent preparations include silver nitrate, zinc oxide, calamine lotion, tincture of benzoin, and vegetable substances such as tannic and gallic acids, catechu, and oak bark. Some metal salts and acids have also been used as astringents.

astringent

[ə′strin·jənt]
(medicine)
A substance applied to produce local contraction of blood vessels, to shrink mucous membranes, or to check discharges such as serum or mucus.

astringent

a drug or medicine causing contraction of body tissues, checking blood flow, or restricting secretions of fluids
References in periodicals archive ?
Prouve is best known for his astringently functional, mostly metal furniture, but he was so enamored of pressed steel and aluminum that he wanted to use them for all aspects of modern living.
As historian Paul Leland Haworth astringently wrote in his 1912 study Reconstruction and Union, Stevens "possessed much of the sternness of the old Puritans, without their morality.
The French philosopher Jean-Francois Revel astringently summed up this aspect of Kedourie's message when he observed that "Democratic civilization is the first in history to blame itself because another power is trying to destroy it.
Praised by some critics as Kaurismaki's best (of nearly 25 films I'd recommend, just for starters, the more astringently wry ``Calamari Union,'' ``Hamlet Goes Business'' and ``Leningrad Cowboys Go America''), it's your basic uplift-the-poor parable with a memory-loss theme thrown in for some semblance of a plot line.