astringent

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astringent

(əstrĭn`jənt), substance that shrinks body tissues. Astringent medicines cause shrinkage of mucous membranes or exposed tissues and are often used internally to check discharge of serum or mucous secretions in sore throat, hemorrhage, diarrhea, or peptic ulcer. Externally applied astringents, which cause mild coagulation of skin proteins, dry, harden, and protect the skin. Mildly astringent solutions are used in the relief of such minor skin irritations as those resulting from superficial cuts, allergies, insect bites, or athlete's foot. Astringent preparations include silver nitrate, zinc oxide, calamine lotion, tincture of benzoin, and vegetable substances such as tannic and gallic acids, catechu, and oak bark. Some metal salts and acids have also been used as astringents.

astringent

[ə′strin·jənt]
(medicine)
A substance applied to produce local contraction of blood vessels, to shrink mucous membranes, or to check discharges such as serum or mucus.

astringent

a drug or medicine causing contraction of body tissues, checking blood flow, or restricting secretions of fluids
References in periodicals archive ?
As he writes so astringently, "There is a warning here for those who would read early-modern conditions into the nineteenth-century rural world.
While Ruth is a humble and sympathetic narrator and Alice of A Map of the World an astringently intelligent and sophisticated one, readers may have a bit more trouble falling into line behind Walter McCloud who's the woefully inadequate, if game.
He comments perceptively and often astringently on dozens of his contemporaries, both European and American - he loved Italy in particular and speaks of many Italian writers and thinkers, including Ignazio Silone, Carlo Levi, Paolo Milano, Salvemini.
The title character of Mary Oslund's astringently funny Reflex Doll, the linchpin for her new piece, provides a much-needed antidote to the sugary excesses of the holiday season.
Wisely Downie does not attempt another soft-focused study of literature and society, but concentrates astringently on the literary contribution to shaping and contesting the Revolution Settlement.
the South African poet, Breyten Breytenbach, astringently remarks: