atheroma

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Related to atheromatous: Atheromatous plaques

atheroma

[‚ath·ə′rōm·ə]
(medicine)
A lipid deposit in the inner wall of an artery; characteristic of atherosclerosis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
mouse, on a high-fat diet, manifests cholesterol levels in excess of 1,200 mg/dL and develops vascular fatty streaks and atheromatous plaques extremely rapidly (Zhang et al.
Avoidance of embolic injury involves attention to surgical technique such as avoidance of cross-clamping atheromatous regions of the aorta and meticulous de-airing.
Weight Histopathology of Myocardium Case heart no (gr) Macroscopy of the heart Hypertrophy Scar 1 200 Aneurism in both ventricles + + and apex, thinning and scarring of aneurism wall, scarring of LV, atherosclerosis of the aorta 90% obstructive calcified atheromatous plaques of both coronary arteries.
The laboratory measurement of cholesterol is a surrogate marker for lipoprotein particles, which can be considered a proxy for the degree of atheromatous deposits, which is a surrogate for the endpoint of atherosclerosis-related morbidity and mortality.
Coronary heart disease results from accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of the arteries that supply the myocardium [1].
It stands to reason that most published studies relating to carotid disease pertain to atheromatous disease.
Periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis.
C pneumoniae is known to attack arterial endothelial cells and become intracellular, causing damage to the vessel lining without the preexistence of an atheromatous deposit.
The Committee suggested the inhalations of particles found in the air causes chemical reactions in the body to take place which increase the likelihood of blood to clot and/or atheromatous plaque to rupture, leading to a heart attack.
pneumoniae with atherosclerosis include seroepidemiologic studies, direct detection of bacterial components in atherosclerotic lesions, occasional isolation of viable organisms from coronary and carotid atheromatous tissue, and in vitro and animal experiments (reviewed in 8,9,13,14).
Most middle-aged men have blobs of fat - atheromatous plaques - which stick to the coronary artery wall.