atmospheric absorption

atmospheric absorption

[¦at·mə¦sfir·ik əb′zȯrp·shən]
(geophysics)
The reduction in energy of microwaves by gases and moisture in the atmosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
9 mm, the antenna can be small; and atmospheric absorption limits interference with other systems.
Many Astronomical observations and experiments are severely limited by the Earths atmosphere: atmospheric turbulence, atmospheric absorption, scattering and emissions, bad weather and other phenomena degrade or prevent many astronomical observations.
Haze or fog is a common natural phenomenon formed by the increased size of fine suspended particles in the atmospheric media which affect atmospheric absorption, emission and scattering of light.
As the satellite orbits at 650 kilometres above Earth, the FTS is poised to take sequences of atmospheric absorption spectra twice a day, during sunrise and sunset.
From 1 km to 4 km, the atmospheric structure constant does not depend on sub aerial atmospheric structure constant and wind velocity due to atmospheric absorption.
This would allow high data rate communications and reduce atmospheric absorption.
The terrestrial radiation is attenuated by two different phenomena, (i) atmospheric scattering by air molecules, water vapor and aerosols, and (ii) atmospheric absorption by mainly ozone, water and carbon dioxide.
The millimeter-wave W-band, however, experiences significant signal attenuation due to factors such as atmospheric absorption and rain, and there has been demand for high-output power amplifiers that can transmit a stable signal across distances ranging from a few kilometers to several tens of kilometers.
Atmospheric absorption of one of these gamma rays creates a short-lived shower of subatomic particles.
In the visible region, atmospheric absorption accounts for significant deviations of the solar spectrum from the thermal lineshape.
Atmospheric absorption at E-band is much less than at 60 GHz, where oxygen absorption causes high link attenuation, and significantly better than at optical frequencies, where free-space optic systems can experience 200 dB/km attenuation in thick fog.

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