atmospheric scattering

atmospheric scattering

[¦at·mə¦sfir·ik ′skad·ər·iŋ]
(geophysics)
A change in the direction of propagation, frequency, or polarization of electromagnetic radiation caused by interaction with the atoms of the atmosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
From space, coronal plasma emissions are very clear out to several solar radii (Rs) from the Sun's surface because of the lack of atmospheric scattering.
Ultraviolet B radiation is much more variable than ultraviolet A as latitude increases due to atmospheric scattering of the light and absorption by oxygen.
The Earth microwave background (EMB), atmospheric scattering and the generation of isotropy.
Stronger atmospheric scattering of blue light means that the light that reaches the lunar surface is predominantly red in colour so observers on Earth saw the Moon to appear brick-coloured, rusty, blood-red or sometimes dark grey, depending on the terrestrial conditions.
Stronger atmospheric scattering of blue light means that the light that reaches the lunar surface is predominantly red in colour so observers on Earth see a moon that may be brick-coloured, rusty, blood-red or sometimes dark grey, depending on terrestrial conditions on the night.

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