atom interferometer


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atom interferometer

[‚ad·əm ‚in·tə·fə′räm·əd·ər]
(physics)
A device which measures the interference effects that result when a beam of atoms is manipulated in such a way that the de Broglie waves of the atoms are split into two components and subsequently recombined.
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In Mlynek's atom interferometer, a supersonic beam of helium atoms passes through a 2-micrometer-wide opening in a thin gold foil.
In an atom interferometer, for example, "each atom has been split and is going both ways at once," explains David E.
Atom interferometers show similar patterns based on the number of atoms at each spot on the detector.
Pritchard's team and a German group unveiled their atom interferometers in the May 27 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS.
Washington, Feb 18 (ANI): A new experiment in an atom interferometer has provided for the most precise test yet of Albert Einstein's gravitational redshift.
Now, a new experiment in an atom interferometer measures this slowdown 10,000 times more accurately than before, and finds it to be exactly what Einstein predicted.
Physicists are even rallying to put an atom interferometer in orbit to test theories like Einstein's general relativity with unparalleled exactness.
If the path an atom takes varies by even a thousandth of a nanometer (a picometer) an atom interferometer can spot the difference, Cronin says.
Kasevich's lab is using an atom interferometer to sense tiny fluctuations in the Earth's gravity.
Because the atoms move much more slowly than photons, an atom interferometer of the same dimensions as one based on a light laser has the potential to be 10 billion times more sensitive in measurements of the rotation of Earth or other objects, scientists say.
A new generation of high-precision gravity sensors such as torsion pendulums and atom interferometers, and future concepts for kilometer-scale gravitational-wave (GW) detectors searching for ripples in spacetime from colliding and exploding stars, will make it possible to study gravity perturbations in the frequency range 0.
The measurement that we report here represents a million-fold increase in absolute accuracy compared to measurements obtained by previous atom interferometers," said the Stanford scientists.