atomic vibration


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atomic vibration

[ə′täm·ik ‚vī′brā·shən]
(atomic physics)
Periodic, nearly harmonic changes in position of the atoms in a molecule giving rise to many properties of matter, including molecular spectra, heat capacity, and heat conduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
A spectroscopic method of analyzing an object's makeup by analyzing the scattering of light due to the light's wavelength being changed upon reflection by atomic vibration
A type of atomic vibration never before seen in ordinary solid materials has been observed in uranium.
Conventional optical lattice clocks cannot eliminate influences of electromagnetic waves released from grid walls surrounding the atoms, which disrupts the cycles of the atomic vibrations.
But when it does, it's less likely to set another electron free than it is to create atomic vibrations that squander the electron's excess energy on heat.
Others believed, as did physicist Rudolf Peierls, that atomic vibrations and distortions trumped all.
In a process known as Raman emission, incoming energy stimulates atomic vibrations, which then decay, in part, into photons.
In conventional superconductors, atomic vibrations induce the electron pairing.
The difficulty has been the need to keep the gap between the tip and the sample so precisely constant that voltage variations induced by atomic vibrations would stand out.
All materials store heat in the form of atomic vibrations.
All other units - of time, length, or electric charge - have their definitions rooted in constants of nature, such as the speed of light or atomic vibrations.
He points out that in a real material, the presence of structural defects and the "noise" of atomic vibrations would readily swamp a quantum computation.