atony

(redirected from atonic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to atonic: atonic bladder, atonic constipation, atonic dyspepsia

atony

[′at·ən·ē]
(medicine)
Absence or extremely low degree of tonus.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Japan, the agent was approved in March 2013 under the brand name Inovelon as an adjunctive therapy to other AEDs in the treatment of tonic and atonic seizures associated with LGS when therapy with other AEDs is considered inadequate, and was launched in May 2013 as Inovelon 100 mg and 200 mg tablets.
If you think that all worlds are worlds in which that cannot occur, what I call lifeless or atonic worlds and which I think are fundamental to democratic thinking, then there are the laws that govern what merely happens--and you can't really do very much.
Not to mention, he started to experience, at the time, what are called atonic seizures (drop-attack seizures of paralysis).
Consequently, she goes on to eat even less of a starched up ration with no fibre, she begins to milk, sickens and her flaccid, atonic abomasum slips up past her poorly filled rumen to "twist".
Also, Jon English's new Atonic shampoo and conditioner contain naturally-derived herbal extracts, essential oils and proteins to nourish the hair, add shine and remove static.
A value of merely "third person" follows directly from se's place in the pronominal paradigm, which exhibits compelling formal parallelism between clitics (me, te, se), prepositional objects (mi, ti, si), atonic possessives (mi, tu, su) and tonic possessives (mio, tuyo, suyo), the last three being further inflected (in morphologically parallel fashion) for the gender and number of the possessed item.
Regarding the difference between barberi and barbari, Nerida Newbigin writes, "The atonic a and e are almost interchangeable.
sound-change: 'cold' and 'pretty' were both tonic, while 'silkworm', 'mortar', and 'hairpiece' were either atonic or had their tone on the final syllable alone.
In the first stanza, the progression from tonic back-vowel to atonic vowel in the a-rhyme sound -ace (a, then schwa) is echoed especially in the first lines: sprange in, balke, bod in, goste is, gon in, Godez, aven-.
His idiosyncratic use of ez is well justified by the scribe's use of ez as a plural marker and verbal termination after atonic e.