atrium

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Related to atrial: fibrillation, atrial fibrillation, atrial septal defect, atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia, Atrial systole, atrial kick

atrium

(ā`trēəm), term for an interior court in Roman domestic architecture and also for a type of entrance court in early Christian churches. The Roman atrium was an unroofed or partially roofed area with rooms opening from it. In early times its center held a cooking hearth. After the 2d cent. B.C., when the hearth was placed elsewhere, the center of the atrium held a tank (impluvium) to receive rainwater falling through the opening, which also furnished light to the surrounding rooms. In more luxurious and complex Roman dwellings, the private apartments had a court of their own, called the peristyle, and the atrium served merely as a semipublic reception hall. The ruins of Pompeii contain remains of atria in their various forms. In early Christian churches, the atrium was a large arcaded or colonnaded open court, serving as a general meeting place, in front of the church itself, with a fountain used for ablutions in its center. The basilican churches of Sant'Ambrogio in Milan and San Clemente in Rome have noteworthy atria. This type of large forecourt is also a characteristic element of the Muslim mosque. The term also refers to a modern building's central court, an often soaring interior space with a large skylight. Creating a flood of natural light and usually filled with plants, the feature has become practically ubiquitous in contemporary architecture; it is used predominantly in commercial buildings.

Atrium

The forecourt of an early Christian basilica, with colonnades on all four sides, and usually a fountain in the center. It was derived from the entrance court or hall of a Roman dwelling, roofed to leave a large opening to admit light. Rain was received in a cistern below. The modern version is a common vertical space with skylights in an office or hotel complex.

atrium

[′ā·trē·əm]
(anatomy)
The heart chamber that receives blood from the veins.
The main part of the tympanic cavity, below the malleus.
The external chamber to receive water from the gills in lancelets and tunicates.
(architecture)
An open court located within a building.

atrium

atrium, 2
atrium, 1
1.. The main hall of an ancient Roman house, containing an opening to the sky

atrium

1. the open main court of a Roman house
2. a central often glass-roofed hall that extends through several storeys in a building, such as a shopping centre or hotel
3. a court in front of an early Christian or medieval church, esp one flanked by colonnades
4. Anatomy a cavity or chamber in the body, esp the upper chamber of each half of the heart
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers suggest that warfarin works by preventing the formation of blood clots within the heart's atrial chambers.
com/research/c5762c/global_atrial_fibr) has announced the addition of the "Global Atrial Fibrillation Market 2010-2014" report to their offering.
With more and more congenital heart disease patients today surviving decades longer than was typical in the past, health care systems will need to be ready to deal with a growing burden of atrial arrhythmia--related disease, including stroke, heart failure, and need for hospital-based interventions, added Dr.
In the new study of about 500 stroke sufferers, presented here Thursday at the American Heart Association's Joint Conference on Stroke and Cerebral Circulation, strokes in people with atrial fibrillation were twice as likely to be fatal than strokes in those without the heart disorder.
Compared with the women with no atrial fibrillation, the 88 patients (3%) with atrial fibrillation during the study were significantly more likely to be older (70 years vs.
The non-pharmacological atrial fibrillation devices market has been further sub-divided into therapeutic procedures such as catheter ablation procedures, maze surgery and electric cardioversion.
The Asia-Pacific atrial fibrillation market is expected to grow at the highest CAGR on account of the rising prevalence of atrial fibrillation in China coupled with the introduction of new healthcare reforms and rapid economic development in the country.
Those early findings, which the coauthors and others call "very dramatic," prompted an independent panel of scientists appointed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to recommend halting one part of the study last November so that researchers could provide aspirin or warfarin to most participants with atrial fibrillation.
Nasdaq: ABIO), a biopharmaceutical company developing genetically-targeted therapies for atrial fibrillation and other cardiovascular diseases, today announced results of analyses of atrial fibrillation and pharmacogenetic data from the BEST trial, a previously conducted Phase 3 heart failure trial involving Gencaro in 2,708 advanced heart failure patients.
4 Classification in Atrial Fibrillation: Introduction 13
In the more than 30,000 participants with available baseline electrocardiogram data, investigators looked at the effects of baseline atrial fibrillation and factors associated with the prevalence of baseline and new atrial fibrillation.