atrium


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atrium

(ā`trēəm), term for an interior court in Roman domestic architecture and also for a type of entrance court in early Christian churches. The Roman atrium was an unroofed or partially roofed area with rooms opening from it. In early times its center held a cooking hearth. After the 2d cent. B.C., when the hearth was placed elsewhere, the center of the atrium held a tank (impluvium) to receive rainwater falling through the opening, which also furnished light to the surrounding rooms. In more luxurious and complex Roman dwellings, the private apartments had a court of their own, called the peristyle, and the atrium served merely as a semipublic reception hall. The ruins of Pompeii contain remains of atria in their various forms. In early Christian churches, the atrium was a large arcaded or colonnaded open court, serving as a general meeting place, in front of the church itself, with a fountain used for ablutions in its center. The basilican churches of Sant'Ambrogio in Milan and San Clemente in Rome have noteworthy atria. This type of large forecourt is also a characteristic element of the Muslim mosque. The term also refers to a modern building's central court, an often soaring interior space with a large skylight. Creating a flood of natural light and usually filled with plants, the feature has become practically ubiquitous in contemporary architecture; it is used predominantly in commercial buildings.

Atrium

The forecourt of an early Christian basilica, with colonnades on all four sides, and usually a fountain in the center. It was derived from the entrance court or hall of a Roman dwelling, roofed to leave a large opening to admit light. Rain was received in a cistern below. The modern version is a common vertical space with skylights in an office or hotel complex.

atrium

[′ā·trē·əm]
(anatomy)
The heart chamber that receives blood from the veins.
The main part of the tympanic cavity, below the malleus.
The external chamber to receive water from the gills in lancelets and tunicates.
(architecture)
An open court located within a building.

atrium

atrium, 2
atrium, 1
1.. The main hall of an ancient Roman house, containing an opening to the sky

atrium

1. the open main court of a Roman house
2. a central often glass-roofed hall that extends through several storeys in a building, such as a shopping centre or hotel
3. a court in front of an early Christian or medieval church, esp one flanked by colonnades
4. Anatomy a cavity or chamber in the body, esp the upper chamber of each half of the heart
References in periodicals archive ?
We are excited to welcome residents, patients and team members to the Atrium Health and Senior Living -- Midwest Family.
We are pleased to add Turner Construction Company to Atrium Corporate Park's prestigious roster of tenants," stated Mason.
Very thin, flexible tubes (catheters) are placed in a vein of an arm or leg and advanced to the right atrium and ventricle.
His experience, leadership style and drive for results will benefit Atrium and our customers through improved efficiency and cost control across our supply chain and logistics functions.
The New Jersey locations that are a part of Atrium Health and Senior Living Family include:
On the third and fourth floor of the building is a 6,500 square meter event and conference center with a double height ballroom that opens up to the atrium.
As well as being a great light-chute, the atrium is the central element in the building's climate control system.
The atrium itself is a grand, multi-level space covered by a space-frame roof that is stiffened by a dramatic king post truss made of turned fir logs held together with steel tension rods and connectors.
Continued labeling of all Atrium window screens warning users of the danger of falls through open windows
We are pleased to announce the sale of our Atrium and Campus Drive portfolio to LaSalle Investment Management.
Monks joins Atrium as the new Senior Vice President of Operations