atrium

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atrium

(ā`trēəm), term for an interior court in Roman domestic architecture and also for a type of entrance court in early Christian churches. The Roman atrium was an unroofed or partially roofed area with rooms opening from it. In early times its center held a cooking hearth. After the 2d cent. B.C., when the hearth was placed elsewhere, the center of the atrium held a tank (impluvium) to receive rainwater falling through the opening, which also furnished light to the surrounding rooms. In more luxurious and complex Roman dwellings, the private apartments had a court of their own, called the peristyle, and the atrium served merely as a semipublic reception hall. The ruins of Pompeii contain remains of atria in their various forms. In early Christian churches, the atrium was a large arcaded or colonnaded open court, serving as a general meeting place, in front of the church itself, with a fountain used for ablutions in its center. The basilican churches of Sant'Ambrogio in Milan and San Clemente in Rome have noteworthy atria. This type of large forecourt is also a characteristic element of the Muslim mosque. The term also refers to a modern building's central court, an often soaring interior space with a large skylight. Creating a flood of natural light and usually filled with plants, the feature has become practically ubiquitous in contemporary architecture; it is used predominantly in commercial buildings.

Atrium

The forecourt of an early Christian basilica, with colonnades on all four sides, and usually a fountain in the center. It was derived from the entrance court or hall of a Roman dwelling, roofed to leave a large opening to admit light. Rain was received in a cistern below. The modern version is a common vertical space with skylights in an office or hotel complex.

atrium

[′ā·trē·əm]
(anatomy)
The heart chamber that receives blood from the veins.
The main part of the tympanic cavity, below the malleus.
The external chamber to receive water from the gills in lancelets and tunicates.
(architecture)
An open court located within a building.

atrium

atrium, 2
atrium, 1
1.. The main hall of an ancient Roman house, containing an opening to the sky

atrium

1. the open main court of a Roman house
2. a central often glass-roofed hall that extends through several storeys in a building, such as a shopping centre or hotel
3. a court in front of an early Christian or medieval church, esp one flanked by colonnades
4. Anatomy a cavity or chamber in the body, esp the upper chamber of each half of the heart
References in periodicals archive ?
When the BioSTAR[R] device is deployed at the PFO, an umbrella of FortaFlex[R] sits on both the right and left atrium of the heart, effectively closing the hole between the heart chambers.
The unique SoloPath design provides the access insertion of a small catheter that when positioned in the atrium of the heart can be gently expanded to provide a large working lumen to perform therapeutic procedures.
The technology is used to ablate AF by creating long, thin, linear lesions in the atrium of the heart, replicating the curative lines of scar created by the surgical maze procedure.
In this system, an implantable sensor, which measures glucose levels using an enzyme-based electrochemical technology, was inserted in the bloodstream near the right atrium of the heart.
The procedure requires a trans-septal approach, making a small hole in the atrial septum to access the left atrium of the heart and a detailed electrophysiological study to detect pulmonary vein electrical potentials.
While sitting at the console, I was literally immersed inside the patient's left atrium of the heart with an incredible view of the operative field.