auditory nerve


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Related to auditory nerve: cochlea

auditory nerve

[′ȯd·ə‚tōr·ē ′nərv]
(neuroscience)
The eighth cranial nerve in vertebrates; either of a pair of sensory nerves composed of two sets of nerve fibers, the cochlear nerve and the vestibular nerve. Also known as acoustic nerve; vestibulocochlear nerve.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increasing the variability of the temporal patterns of neural activity at the level of the auditory nerve, cochlear nucleus, or medial trapezoidal body would affect the ability of neural comparison mechanisms to extract this information, which requires discriminations on the time scale of tens of microseconds (millionths of a second).
Now we need to examine how the properties of sound are represented or coded in the activity of auditory nerve fibers.
A carrier frequency stimulus vibrates a specific region of the basilar membrane, stimulating a group of hair cells and auditory nerve fibres at this location, at the rate of modulation (Lins, et al.
Inside the cochlea reside microscopic hair cells that bend and, due to sound vibrations or changes in resistance, create electrical signals that are passed on to the auditory nerve and then to the brain.
The decibel level of modern stereo systems, especially in such confined areas as automobiles and stereo headphones, is far beyond the safe range, and permanent auditory nerve damage is the inevitable result of overexposure.
The Panasonic RP-HGS10 Open Ear Headphones sit directly in front of a user's ear to provide sound transmission via advanced bone conduction technology, where vibrations move through the bone directly into the auditory nerve, producing clear sound without blocking the ear canal.
Instead of simply amplifying sound, the external portion of the device gathers acoustic sound from the environment, turns these signals into electrical impulses, and sends them into the internal portion of the device implanted in the cochlea, thereby bypassing damaged portions of the inner ear and stimulating the auditory nerve directly.
The devices use a combination of surgically implanted electrodes that stimulate auditory nerve pathways and an external sound processor worn behind the ear to provide hearing sensations.
He continued: "We showed that the sheath around the auditory nerve is lost in about half of the cells we looked at, a bit like stripping the electrical cable linking an amplifier to the loudspeaker.
Noise can also cause a decrease in the stiffness of hair cell stereocilia and swelling of the auditory nerve endings, which affect the coupling and transfer of sound energy [8].
In the operation a microphone is connected to the auditory nerve via a magnet fitted on the ear.