augur

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augur:

see omenomen,
sign or augury believed to foreshadow the future. Almost any occurrence can be interpreted as an omen. The typical omen was a natural phenomenon, such as a meteor, an eclipse, or the flight of birds.
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augur

(in ancient Rome) a religious official who observed and interpreted omens and signs to help guide the making of public decisions
References in periodicals archive ?
People throughout all history Have lived in ashen cities or died in them Marcel Duchamp was joking Wasn't he, as always when he said Dust-covered glass Might offer auguries Of our predicament O mirror, mirror How have my people been distracted so They don't care any longer who they are?
But the auguries are not great for global brands in the US.
The other odes in the Poems on the Underground series include exerpts from William Blake's Auguries of Innocence and Lord Alfred Tennyson's In Memoriam.
The auguries after the first were not good following the most pedestrian account of the Barber of Seville Overture you could imagine.
auguries of steel blinded by their own reflections and circled
So far from exploring this idea, or the alternative possibility of a belief in a non-Christian godhead, Galvin quickly attempts (apparently by way of compliment) to put a more scientific slant on the reading of omens, by saying that "even the taking of auguries is less superstitious than one would imagine.
Although inhabitants young and old take to confiding their dreams, omens, and auguries to one another, hoping for solace via communal suffering, their pain remains unassuaged.
As to the effectiveness of the newly empowered regions, the auguries are not so good.
Alternatively, you could announce that you are a clairvoyant and can "read the auguries by the swing of the phlegmic pendulum .
Mr Honan takes it for granted that 'The mortal moon hath her eclipse endured' (Sonnet 107) dates itself to 1603, the death of Queen Elizabeth I and the auguries for the reign of James I.
At the outset, Fass delineated the sharply polarized contemporary responses of "traditionalists," who saw the increasing secularism, hedonism, and faddish materialism of the young as evidence of moral collapse, and "progressives," who tended to welcome the youthful revolts against traditional religion and Victorian prudery as auguries of a new and better age.