aural


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aural

Physiology of or relating to the sense or organs of hearing; auricular

aural

[′ȯr·əl]
(biology)
Pertaining to the ear or the sense of hearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Total quantity or scope: The contract is for the benefits of clean development in services and bio-cleaning all 6 sites Aural distributed over the Alsatian territory over a 4 year period.
When the CC transducer is placed on the aural cartilage, sound is transmitted to the cochlea via three possible routes in an anatomically normal ear (Figure 1(a)).
The aim of the programme is to increase and encourage further Speech and Language Specialists and Special Needs Teachers to gain practical and applied skills in aural rehabilitation activities and skills for students with hearing impairment.
Considering students in the traditional sections, there are two significant findings: Students with a multimodal aural, read/write and kinesthetic (ARK) learning style report lower satisfaction with the course, and students with a multimodal visual, aural, read write and kinesthetic (VARK) score report higher satisfaction with the course.
2934 also would provide Medicare coverage for aural rehabilitation services so that Medicare beneficiaries can receive needed ongoing care to optimize their hearing with the use of a hearing aid.
It concluded that there was not enough evidence from the level of results to deprive the students of the marks they achieved in their aural exam.
Provide aural rehabilitation for residents, families and staff
In the Brazilian town of Esperantina, May 9 will be devoted to aural sex.
This sparse aural context underlined the fleet formality of the cast's interactions.
Les Blomberg, who directs the nonprofit Noise Pollution Clearinghouse, refers to unwanted noise as aural litter or audible trash--"That is how people experience community noise: as someone else's garbage thrown into their space," he says.
The practice of crafting new musical works from bits and pieces of older songs has a long history, from the groundbreaking aural decoupage of comedian Dickie Goodman's 1956 single "The Flying Saucer" to Vanilla Ice's somewhat less inspired lift from David Bowie's "Under Pressure" for his 1990 hit "Ice Ice Baby.
At certain times only one screen was illuminated, at other times visual rhymes and aural rhythms bounced around two or three screens.