auroral


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Related to auroral: auroral oval

auroral

[ə′rȯr·əl]
(astronomy)
The period of dusk before sunrise.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) One of the most consistent debating-points in nineteenth-century auroral science was whether the Aurora Borealis could make sounds: a majority of residents in the Canadian Arctic (indigenous and non-indigenous) seemed to report that it could, while a majority of explorer-scientists (including scientists who had no experience in the field) believed it did not and could not.
The aurorae appear over the Earth's polar regions in the auroral ovals, which is easier to write than to say.
That space, Yumoto says, contains vast quantities of electric currents generated by sharp changes in the earth's electromagnetic field and supplies the electrons needed to trigger an auroral storm.
The vast crowns of light - known as auroral displays - leap more than 1,000 miles skywards, breaking through cloud cover in flame-style brilliance.
It looks like a cable television station, but it's something far more ominous: the military's semi-secret High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), designed to give the Pentagon strategic control over the upper atmosphere.
Lins's erotic novel of candid yet flawless good taste, full of saturated crescendos and rhapsodic rests, works on every other level as well: a divine yet profane comedy, a tragedy in which the lovers are the cosmic spiral's sacrificial offering to itself, a hymn of celebration in which the brain runs riot, and a continuum of freely sculpted prose that sometimes feels like an auroral display pent up in a bell jar.
Blue auroral mists are mingled with his cassia banners.
Spectacular auroral displays above North Wales captured by photog-|raphers Tracey Snelus, above, and Neil Thomas, right
25, MAVEN saw a bright ultraviolet auroral glow spanning Mars' northern hemisphere.
But from time to time, as happened this week, we see huge spikes of solar and auroral activity.
It is certainly true that this is an uncommon event at the latitude of the UK and most of Europe, but perhaps this is simply because auroral displays are difficult to see in the bright summer evenings when NLC appear.