auroral storm

auroral storm

[ə′rȯr·əl ¦stȯrm]
(geophysics)
A rapid succession of auroral substorms, occurring in a short period, of the order of a day, during a geomagnetic storm.
References in periodicals archive ?
This indicates the presence of major geomagnetic activity liable to be associated with an auroral storm.
Observers in southern England who would like to know if a big magnetic and auroral storm is likely and could become visible in their locality should visit the useful American website www.
That space, Yumoto says, contains vast quantities of electric currents generated by sharp changes in the earth's electromagnetic field and supplies the electrons needed to trigger an auroral storm.
Auroral storms -- the ghostly and etheral phenomenon that now and then whips up the polar skies -- probably originate in the outer space about 60,000 kilometers from the nocturnal face of the earth, according to scientists at Kyushu University.
Auroral storms are generated by larger than usual quantities of electrons interacting in the mix.
Auroras vary throughout the night during an auroral storm, yet seem best about midnight.
The tail is supposedly the region that supplies the first steps toward providing the energy for an auroral storm.
In the meantime, researchers continue to comb through the Galileo data, tracking down intriguing hints of links between auroral storms observed from Earth and activity in the magnetotail.
Hubble images, when combined with Cassini measurements of the solar wind, show it is the pressure of the solar wind that appears to drive auroral storms on Saturn.
Jovian auroral storms, like those on Earth, develop when electrically charged particles crash into the magnetic field surrounding the planet and then spiral inward toward the north and south magnetic poles.