auroral zone

auroral zone

[ə′rȯr·əl ‚zōn]
(geophysics)
A roughly circular band around either geomagnetic pole within which there is a maximum of auroral activity; lies about 10-15° geomagnetic latitude from the geomagnetic poles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ian Griffin, director of the Otago Museum in New Zealand, shared snippets of his experience on Twitter saying, 'Nice trip through the southern auroral zone tonight on Flight To the Lights.
Nice trip through the southern auroral zone tonight on #flighttothelights Naked eye auroras were spectacular photographically
The images revealed that "there are different kinds of irregularities in the auroral zone compared to the polar cap," according to coauthor Anthony Mannucci, such that "the effects on radio signals will be different in these two locations.
Geomagnetically he is closer to the auroral zone than the United Kingdom and is much better placed to ob serve this phenomenon.
Satellites and ground-based radars reveal that there is a surprising outflow of ionized oxygen atoms from the auroral zone into space.
For the Northern Hemisphere, the aurora should be visible mainly in North America, since the sun is illuminating most of the auroral zone in Russia and Scandinavia.
They believe this radiation is closely related to the soft radiation previously detected during rocket flights in the auroral zone.
During the environmental study early in the progress of the HAARP project, Gakona, Alaska, was identified as a DOD-owned location within the Arctic auroral zone.
Three bright areas dominate the dayside auroral zone (left map), the view of Uranus facing the sun as Voyager 2 swung past the rotating planet.
com for up to the minute information, and a gallery of exquisite photographs from the Auroral Zone.
Unlike it predecessor VISIONS-1 that observed the outflow at night from the polar auroral zones this mission will observe the phenomenon during the day from Earths magnetic cusps regions in the magnetic cocoon near Earths poles where the magnetic field lines dip down toward the ground.
In this respect, Prof Aylward said that Birkeland had got it wrong in that electrons do not hit our atmosphere directly, but incoming electrons alter the degree of coupling, making the auroral zones expand or contract.