auteur

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auteur

(ōtör`), in film criticism, a director who so dominates the film-making process that it is appropriate to call the director the auteur, or author, of the motion picture. The auteur theory holds that the director is the primary person responsible for the creation of a motion picture and imbues it with his or her distinctive, recognizable style. Propounded most notably by the French director and film critic François TruffautTruffaut, François
, 1932–84, French film director and critic. Known in his early 20s as a writer for the influential French film journal Cahiers du Cinéma,
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 and the American film critic Andrew Sarris, it has been attacked by others, including Pauline KaelKael, Pauline
, 1919–2001, American film critic, b. Petaluma, Calif. Possessed of extremely strong opinions about movies and a feisty, pop-inflected style, Kael was noted for her provocative, passionate, and tough-minded film criticism.
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his auteurist re-examination of Psycho, William Rothman finds Van Sant's remake profoundly uninteresting, a postmodern exercise that formalist analysis reveals as lacking in force and meaning (1999: 29-33).
It's apt that Sarris's remarks were originally "the keynote speech of the 'Specters of Legitimacy' conference"--legitimation has too often been the name of the auteurist game, a sterile lust for respectability via hidebound notions of artistic "significance.
Stam affirms Elsaesser's argument that Minnelli's films are thinly disguised auteurist parables where tragedy takes the form of constraints on an emotional or artistic temperament, and goes on to suggest that Minnelli the auteur is split into the two protagonists, Kruger, the autocratic director and Andrus the neurotic, failing actor who takes over directing when the former falls ill.
From an auteurist perspective, Airbag may easily be entitled to aesthetic consideration by virtue of its intertextual references to formal and thematic elements that trace back to Bajo Ulloa's previous films, as well as to Spain's authorial tradition, only reformulated in a postmodern style of address.
He ends his chapter with a kind of call for auteurist politics, echoing Orson Welles' view that the best new films must allow critics, filmmakers, and viewers to "rethink or criticize the nature of movies" (218).
In emphasising a more phenomenological aspect of the spectator's viewing experience, Sallitt's approach avoids the opposite extremes of auteurist and structuralist theorising on the role of the camera.
On the contrary, the views expressed by Spanish director, producer, and former president of the National Film Academy Jose Luis Borau, and editor Peter Evans in the prologue and introduction to the critical anthology Spanish Cinema: The Auteurist Tradition, while arguing, consistent with the book's focus, for the central role exercised by the director, also give evidence of a striking, though unacknowledged, evolution in the conception of the auteur.
Thus, other commentators, less concerned with making auteurist arguments, have noted how Woo's characteristically violent films have been, with the exception of Bullet in the Head (1990), "paradoxically compelling and pleasurable," in large part because of Chow Yun-Fat's performances (Sandell, 1994).
In the broad spectrum offered by the Toronto International Film Festival, In & Out found itself juxtaposed to Happy Together, the gay-themed film that won auteurist and art-house filmmaker Wong Kar-Wai (Chungking Express, Ashes of Time, Fallen Angels) the Best Director prize at the 1997 Cannes Film Festival.
In the late 1950s, emerging European filmmakers such as Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard adopted Sirk as a role model for their own auteurist attempts at filmmaking, celebrating Written on the Wind and A Time to Love and a Time to Die for their directorial vision and style.
But the claim, the basis of auteurist criticism, can have its drawbacks and particularly so when it leads to the kind of critical thinking that has greeted his two most recent films, The Age of Innocence (1993) and Casino (1995).
In regards to auteurist approaches, Ebert forged a via media between the extremes of Sarris and Kael.