autoantibody


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autoantibody

[¦ȯd·ō′ant·i‚bäd·ē]
(immunology)
An antibody formed by an individual against his own tissues; common in hemolytic anemias.
References in periodicals archive ?
More helpful to the clinician is the autoantibody pattern or profile, which multiplex arrays such as NALIA can readily and economically provide.
Cost-effectiveness of an autoantibody test (AABT) as an aid to diagnosis of lung cancer" Sunday, June 6, 2010, 8 a.
On the other hand, the results of the dual-label TR-IFMA assay and the RBA assays did not correlate well linearly, mainly because of the limited linear range of the RBA assays at high autoantibody concentrations, especially in the GADA assay, as can be seen from the shapes of the correlation graphs (Fig.
It should also be remembered that the remarkably high frequency of decreased recovery of cTnI is related to the fact that cTnI assays aim to measure very small amounts of the antigen, so that even minute autoantibody titers may exert a noticeable inhibitory effect.
One disadvantage of the ELISA and TRIFMA is the higher sample volume required compared with the RBA, particularly for autoantibody determination in newborns.
52,53] This Group has conducted 4 annual workshops from 1988 to 1992; the 1988 and 1989 consensus workshops were conducted to define inter-laboratory concordance when detecting autoantibody specificities in rheumatic diseases.
today announced that it is hosting a webinar to show participants how they can generate multiplexed autoantibody assay results in a one-step, 15 minute process.
Number of autoantibodies (against insulin, GAD or ICA512/IA2) rather than particular autoantibody specificities determines risk of type 1 diabetes.
Immunization that results in an IgG autoantibody response requires switching of B-lymphocyte class, and therefore CD4 T cells must be involved in addition to naive mature B cells.
Oncimmune's EarlyCDT-Lung test has increased the sensitivity of the autoantibody test while maintaining a high level of specificity.
One should consider that an autoantibody to antigen may have a negative (interference) or positive (stabilizing) effect on the measurement of the antigen, and that multiple autoantibody/antigen pairs may act independently.