autochthon

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autochthon

[ȯ′täk·thən]
(geology)
A succession of rock beds that have been moved comparatively little from their original site of formation, although they may be folded and faulted extensively.
(paleontology)
A fossil occurring where the organism once lived.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, the classifications remain in place and the autochthones, representing the "receiving society," still form the point of reference.
The categories realized in the chart are split from the Dutch national population in Turks, Moroccans, Surinamese, Antillean, and autochthones.
Three options of spare time contacts are measured: "more with members of own group," "equally much with both," and "more with autochthones.
In the table, the category autochthones explicitly refer to the accompanying text by a footnote, in which is explained that at this point in the table the reading changes: "more with members of own group" is replaced by "more with allochthonous groups.
In this sense, then, autochthony can be said to be a neoliberal mode of belonging, one whose attempts to contain contestation are based on allegations that any demand for rights and/or resources by "non-Natives," including a radical rethinking of how rights and resources are thought of and distributed, is tantamount to a disregard for, and even colonization of, the autochthones.
Farmers, by this point, were adamant that the corridor would be acceptable only if it were based on a calendar that suited their own needs as local autochthones and holders of customary land tenure.
Land, politics, intergenerational relations and the institution of the tutorat amongst autochthones and immigrants (Gban region, Cote d'Ivoire)' in R.
In the light of the emergence and growth of communities in Yorubaland in particular, it could be said that some of the groups that claimed to be autochthones were in fact earlier or more powerful group of settlers who were challenged by the hostile environment in which they found themselves to seek better accommodation elsewhere.
It combines a naturalisation of the idea of belonging with a vagueness as to what constitutes the essence of belonging; and it can thus be pursued by groups which would not necessarily be thought of as autochthone by others.