autochthonous

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autochthonous

[ȯ′täk·thə·nas]
(ecology)
Pertaining to organisms or organic sediments that are indigenous to a given ecosystem.
(geology)
Having been formed or occurring in the place where found.
References in periodicals archive ?
Far from being a contradiction or a mere reaction, such moves toward autochthony are deeply embedded within the processes of capitalist globalization.
By depicting the de facto social position of the drama's characters as largely incompatible with the Athenian myth of autochthony, the Ion depicts the gap between ideological pretence and reality as lived and thus visualises conflicting discourses within contemporary Athenian society.
Bambach thinks that the commitment to autochthony undermines the possibilities of reading Heidegger in an anarchic spirit (p.
Thus, there seems to be an inherent dichotomy in the notion of autochthony in Heidegger's work, one side of which--exposure--Charles Bambach perhaps neglects.
This approaches Ernest Renan's formulation of the nation as an everyday plebiscite, and it provides distance from the destructive notion of the nation as autochthony.
I am thinking here in particular of the work of Boyarin and Boyarin which attempts to uncouple Jewish identity from a sense of spatial entitlement or autochthony (Boyarin & Boyarin, 1995).
These concerns are firmly applied to the distinctions (Bourdieu 1979) developed and practiced by Jats in relation to bhangra, many of which articulate autochthony and embody authenticity amid the transitions and challenges of modernity and diaspora.
Krog here seems to try to evoke an ancient autochthony through the somewhat awkward archaisms, as well as some of the ponderousness of the median Afrikaans syntax, and through enhancing a lamenting incantatory structure.
The Anatolian origins of Proto-Indo-European and the autochthony of the Hittites, in R.
She shows how imagined and imaginatively joined audiences elicit among Papuans a sense of response from a would-be sovereign engaging them in a conversation about freedom, rights, autochthony, and so on.
Among Neely's most important works one could mention his early article, "Liberation Theology in Latin America: Antecedents and Autochthony," in Missiology 6 (July 1978), and his 1977 doctoral thesis at The American University, "Protestant Antecedents of the Latin American Theology of Liberation.
Modernity and Autochthony (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990), Carlos Alonso argues that for this reason, modern Latin American cultural practices are undecided in terms of their own modernity; they are both modern and anti-modern since they appeal for exemption from the demands of modernity while they simultaneously seek new (modern) origins for their cultures (p.