autochthonous

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autochthonous

[ȯ′täk·thə·nas]
(ecology)
Pertaining to organisms or organic sediments that are indigenous to a given ecosystem.
(geology)
Having been formed or occurring in the place where found.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geschiere, The Perils of Belonging: Autochthony, Citizenship, and Exclusion in Africa and Europe, University Of Chicago Press 2009.
Usually implying paganism, autochthony, primitivity, and blackness, these terms were sometimes deployed as broad racial categories in nineteenth-century anthropology (Ballard 2008:198, n.
These residents are both Christians and Muslims, so the issue is not about Islam, but an ethnonatioalism and autochthony.
Therefore, for man to take advantage of what science and technology can offer him in relation to autochthony, man must realize that science and technology has reduced the world to a mere backyard.
Second, it is based on the representation, also inter-local, of the border space in a mood of autochthony.
As the Comaroffs argue, one of the outcomes of the debates in 2000 about alien nature was the "displacement of the argument about outsiders into the floral kingdom", a rhetorical move which tended to sanction a previously unspeakable "post-racist form of racism; a form of racism that, by concealing itself in the language of autochthony and alien-nature, [had] come to co-exist seamlessly with a transnational culture of human rights" (2001: 651).
The book presents historical-scientific work on the autochthony of the ethnic Albanians in Macedonia.
Culture-brokers like Malherbe articulated a humor of autochthony, investing it with the dyadic "laugh with a tear".
Citation clusters are symptomatic of an asymmetry that Donna Haraway has pointed to in examining how the deep structure of the myth of masculine self-generation or autochthony compels accounts of technoscience even in critical STS.
Far from being a contradiction or a mere reaction, such moves toward autochthony are deeply embedded within the processes of capitalist globalization.
While the transition was neither immediate nor uniform, the positive emphasis on hybridity and autochthony expressed in "Our America" would be echoed in twentieth-century anti-imperialist writings from many parts of Latin America, most notably Mexico and the Caribbean.
Pedrick's study suggests that the Athenian myth of autochthony might be a source of dread as well as comfort (e.