autoclave curing

autoclave curing

[′ȯd·ō‚klāv ′kyu̇r·iŋ]
(engineering)
Steam curing of concrete products, sand-lime brick, asbestos cement products, hydrous calcium silicate insulation products, or cement in an autoclave at maximum ambient temperatures generally between 340 and 420°F (170 and 215°C).

autoclave curing

Steam curing of concrete products, sand-lime brick, asbestos cement products, hydrous calcium silicate insulation products, or cement in an autoclave at maximum ambient temperatures generally between 340 and 420°F (170 and 215°C).
References in periodicals archive ?
Further material cost reductions are achieved through use of dry fibres instead of more costly prepregs, in combination with Liquid Composite Moulding instead of costly autoclave curing.
The cure process of 977-2A carbon/epoxy composites was evaluated for Quickstep processing using differential scanning calo-rimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical and thermal analysis, and Fourier transformed infrared and results were compared with cure cycle employed for autoclave curing.
High strength concrete could be achieved by incorporating ground quartz sand and fine stone dust as a partial cement replacement in an autoclave curing system (Jaafar et al.
Autoclave curing is required for certain types of high-performance composites.
The widespread method of autoclave curing, it says, makes part handling complicated, the process is time-consuming, and the quality of process control is not satisfactory.
Finally, a production part may be cured under pressure as in compression, transfer or injection molding, under pressure as in autoclave curing, or without pressure as in LCM or microwave and hot air curing.
Autoclave curing temperatures greater than 800F (412C) are easily handled by the nickel tooling.
Brochier sees RTM as 20-40% less expensive than traditional manual prepreg-tape layup and autoclave curing, making it feasible to use composites in more applications.
Replacing the autoclave curing of thermosets, he adds, would require capital intensive thermoplastic forming presses.
These process stages may consist of any combination of the following: Receiving of raw polymers and compounding ingredients, storage; first pass mix; second pass mix: calendering; cold feed or hot feed extrusion; compression, transfer or injection molding; and continuous vulcanization or autoclave curing, etc.
The use of an in-situ sensor and a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer to monitor autoclave curing of epoxy composites was discussed by Foster-Miller, Inc.