Autolysis

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autolysis

[ȯ′täl·ə·səs]
(geochemistry)
Return of a substance to solution, as of phosphate removed from seawater by plankton and returned when these organisms die and decay.
(pathology)
Self-digestion by body cells following somatic or organ death or ischemic injury.

Autolysis

 

self-digestion of animal, plant, and microorganism tissue. In autolysis the cellular proteins, carbohydrates, and fats break down under the action of hydrolytic enzymes in the cells. In living organisms, autolysis is evident in necrotic centers and in cells of malignant neoplasms. Autolysis occurs in decomposing corpses. In plants autolysis occurs after the death of living cells as a result of low temperature, desiccation, and the action of such poisonous substances as chloroform and toluene, as well as during mechanical tissue disintegration. Autolysis of microbe cells is evident in aging microbe cultures and in microorganisms damaged by physical, chemical, or biological agents. Autolysis also occurs in several industrial processes—for example, in tobacco and tea fermentation and during feed storage.

N. P. MESHKOVA

References in periodicals archive ?
Origin of granules in granular cell tumor: intracellular myelin formation with autodigestion.
Schmid-Schonbein and his colleagues at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering discovered that under conditions of shock, the epithelial cell barrier that lines the small intestine becomes permeable thereby causing potent digestive enzymes to be carried into the bloodstream and lymphatic system where they digest and destroy healthy tissue, a process he named Autodigestion.
This complex is highly toxic to the cell, thus disrupts membrane function which ultimately leads to parasite cell autodigestion (25).
The mass spectra are internally mass-calibrated with two fragment-ion masses of the trypsin autodigestion products: amino acid sequences 108-115 ([[M+H].