autoignition


Also found in: Medical.

autoignition

[¦ȯd·ō·ig′nish·ən]
(mechanical engineering)
Spontaneous ignition of some or all of the fuel-air mixture in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. Also known as spontaneous combustion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyclic variability of flame propagation and autoignition in supercharged and naturally aspirated SI engines," PhD thesis, School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Leeds, 2013.
Modeling evaporation effects in conditional moment closure for spray autoignition," Combust.
In this research, several types of lubricant oil were tested at certain temperature points, in order to find out the difference of the autoignition properties and ignition delay time of different lubricant oil.
Correlation of Autoignition Phenomena in Internal Combustion Engines and Rapid Compression Machines," Fifth Symp.
The occurrence of engine knock is caused by autoignition of unburned fuel mixture, the so-called end gas, in the cylinder before the mixture is completely consumed by the propagating flame.
Previous work has shown that conventional diesel ignition improvers, 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN) and di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP), can be used to enhance the autoignition of a regular-grade E10 gasoline in a well premixed low-temperature gasoline combustion (LTGC) engine, hereafter termed an HCCI engine, at naturally aspirated and moderately boosted conditions (up to 180 kPa absolute) with a constant engine speed of 1200 rpm and a 14:1 compression ratio.
High octane hydrocarbons are needed to help prevent autoignition of gasoline (knocking) in an engine and to meet recommended engine octane ratings.
While the present study is not focused on OI from a fuels perspective, it is focused on understanding how autoignition and knock propensity changes as the pressure-temperature conditions change.
Autoignition and Combustion of ULSD and JP8 during Cold Starting of a High Speed Diesel Engine.
2013) report increase in the operation range (rotations) of 2-S ICE, in comparison to 4-S ICE, using auxiliary control of autoignition.
Dimethylcadmium, however, requires a fairly large footprint of a spill before its natural oxidation in air generates enough heat to hit autoignition, and when it does, assuming you survived the blast, the combustion byproduct of cadmium oxide dispersed through the air in a haze is almost as bad as the dimethyl.
Figure 15 shows the ignition delay times measured by shock tubes for n-dodecane (DCN of 74) and the jet fuels with a wide range of autoignition quality (DCN of 31 ~ 60) [33,50].