autoignition


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autoignition

[¦ȯd·ō·ig′nish·ən]
(mechanical engineering)
Spontaneous ignition of some or all of the fuel-air mixture in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. Also known as spontaneous combustion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Autoignition is a process where a combustible mixture spontaneously reacts and releases heat in absence of any concentrated source of ignition such as a spark or a flame (Lefebvre, 1998).
Therefore, simulations can augment experiments in understanding the complex relationship between turbulent flow, mixing and chemical reaction in flames, and autoignition in simple geometric configurations.
Stabilizers are chemical ingredients added to propellants at the time of manufacture to decrease the rate of propellant degradation and reduce the probability of autoignition during its expected useful life.
This system creates temperature and concentration gradients that permit safe mixing of fuel with air at temperatures above the autoignition of the fuel.
ASTM standard tests exist to measure the minimum explosible concentration, the minimum ignition energy (high voltage spark), minimum autoignition temperatures, maximum pressure generated and the maximum rate of pressure rise (which is a measure of the destructive force).
In some cases, temperatures may exceed the autoignition point of the fluid.
Flammability (limits of flammability, flashpoints, autoignition temperatures), risk quantification
was faulty, and that the oil should have been pumped in a closed pipe since it was above its autoignition temperature and represented a fire hazard.
The minimum temperature at which a dust will autoignite when exposed to air heated in a furnace is the minimum autoignition temperature.
In addition, no problems with combustion instabilities, flashback, or autoignition have been observed.
More flash points, as well as molecular formulas, lower and upper explosive limits, autoignition temperatures, and NFPA-type (Red) numerical fire codes