autophagy


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autophagy

[′ȯd·ə‚fā·jē]
(cell and molecular biology)
The cellular process of self-digestion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Polysaccharide from Fuzi likely protects against starvationinduced cytotoxicity in H9c2 cells by increasing autophagy through activation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway.
Protein aggregates have causal roles of several of them, aggregates that may be removed by Nrf2-dependent autophagy.
Purpose: Through a screen designed to identify autophagic regulators from a library of natural compounds, we found that Guttiferone K (GUTK) can activate autophagy in several cancer cell lines.
Lead researcher Dr Rajesh Katare said the team also found that diabetes increased autophagy through activation of the protein Beclin-1, which presented "an extremely promising target for new treatments of diabetes-related cardiac disease.
The fact that this type of cell surface receptor can directly interact with Beclin 1 and shut off autophagy provides fundamental insight into how certain oncogenes may cause cancer," says Levine.
In addition, autophagy leads to a release of ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and free radicals, and the initiation of peroxidation reactions by peroxisomes.
The researchers could restore normal autophagy and synaptic pruning -- and reverse autistic-like behaviors in the mice -- by administering rapamycin, a drug that inhibits mTOR.
During mTOR signaling, MTOR mRNA and protein levels were reduced, and autophagy was induced in rapamycin-treated aged oocytes.
According to a University of Colorado Cancer Center study, autophagy, from the Greek "to eat oneself", is a process of cellular recycling in which cell organelles, called autophagosomes, encapsulate extra or dangerous material and transport it to the cell's lysosomes for disposable.
Editor Hayat presents this second volume of a four-volume series on autophagic processes, with an introduction to the series giving a broad overview of autophagy in healthy and diseased states, partially reproduced from volume I but also containing material specific to this volume.
Kosuke Yamahara, Takashi Uzu, MD, PhD (Shiga University of Medical Science, in Japan), and their colleagues suspected that decreased functioning of a process called autophagy might play a role.