autopsy


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autopsy:

see post-mortem examinationpost-mortem examination
or autopsy,
systematic examination of a cadaver for study or for determining the cause of death. Post-mortems use many methodical procedures to determine the etiology and pathogenesis of diseases, for epidemologic purposes, for establishment of
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.

Autopsy

 

(section, obduction), the examination of a corpse in order to clarify the nature of the morbid changes and establish the cause of death.

Autopsies maybe either pathologicoanatomical or medicolegal; the first explores death from various diseases in a medical facility, while the latter refers to deaths that may be ascribed to violent or criminal action and that are ordered investigated by legal authorities. Autopsy plays an enormous role in instruction and refinement of the physician’s knowledge (as a check for the validity of diagnosis and treatment). Autopsies are also used as a basis for the exploration of problems in thanatology and resuscitation and the statistical indexes of mortality and lethality. Data from medicolegal autopsies have an important and sometimes decisive influence in court. Pathologicoanatomical autopsy is carried out by a pathological anatomist-physician (prosector) in specially equipped institutions attached to clinics or hospitals; medicolegal autopsies are performed by an expert in forensic medicine at the morgue. Autopsies are performed according to a prescribed method, and the findings are presented either in an autopsy report (for pathologicoanatomical autopsy) or a legal statement (for medicolegal autopsy).

V. V. SEROV

autopsy

[′ȯ‚tap·sē]
(pathology)
A postmortem examination of the body to determine cause of death.

autopsy

dissection and examination of a dead body to determine the cause of death
References in periodicals archive ?
In failing to establish the correct means of triggering the Confrontation Clause with respect to autopsy reports, the Second Circuit failed to appreciate an autopsy report's technical nature and susceptibility to error and "shades of gray.
34, Clause 2, which states that the police can release the body if the relatives do not agree to an autopsy.
3) found poor agreement between autopsy and radiological findings owing to the presence of post mortem artefacts, which could not readily be differentiated from true pathology and were more likely to occur with long time intervals between death and imaging.
In Massachusetts General Hospital the autopsy rate for the first five decades of the previous century varied between 20% and 40% of patients who died in the hospital.
Adly criticized the Tahrir Doctors' observations, saying that there should have been a family member attending the autopsy but that none of them were allowed inside.
Frasso said numerous bruises to the girl's torso and "significant" bruising on her back were noted during the autopsy.
The post Pathologists due in Cyprus for fifth autopsy appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
Most important, a medical autopsy is different from a medico-legal autopsy, which is far more delicate as it generates evidentiary documents for criminal and civil lawsuits.
Training for the autopsy starts on Day One, when you take your pathology residency training which takes four years.
The autopsy report also confirmed 'finger marks' on her neck, suggesting that the girl was strangled to death.
6,7] The views of mothers and their families regarding autopsy are essential, [8] as well as understanding stillbirth in the South African context, and the cultural and socio-economic factors specific to it.