avidya


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Avidyā

cause of suffering through desire. [Hindu Phil.: Parrinder, 36]
See: Evil

avidya

ignorance as cause of suffering through desire. [Hindu Phil.: Parrinder, 36]
References in periodicals archive ?
Dark skinned Dasyus are only forces of Avidya or darkness, not a racial metaphor," Frawley added.
Karma in Hindu thought is a spiritual necessity which, by making one judgmental and adjudicatory, helps him to make his way through the maya and avidya of life.
Kundakunda's approach resembles Buddhist and Vedantic models of salvation, which locate the roots of spiritual bondage in ignorance, or avidya, a false consciousness of the true nature of reality, rather than in a state of affairs external to consciousness that causes such ignorance, as the Jain tradition affirms with its doctrine of material karmas obscuring the true, omni-conscious nature of the soul; for he seems, sometimes, to be saying it is not the bondage of the soul by karmic matter, but rather, the perception of it as being so bound, that is the real problem.
Hinduism, especially in its nondual formulation Advaita Vedanta, roots the human condition in ignorance, avidya.
This limitation occurs because of His relation with the five attributes of kala (time), kala (limited creativity), nitayi (destiny), raga (attachment) and avidya, (igonrance).
This attachment to happiness is an illusion; it is avidya.
Mainly because of our own avidya (the Buddhist concept of ignorance), we have joined the list of endangered species.
Opposite to vidya is the avidya, which is tthe knowledge about world and worldly things (Vipashananda, 2006).
Marcus Schmucker examines how the beginning/undertaking--here the distinction between both terms is extremely porous--of the Vedantasastra, especially in Advaita (Sankara, Padmapada, Prakasatman, and Vimuktaman), is tied to the principle of avidya, and follows up with the criticism of this connection in Venkatanatha's Satadusani.
Decisive for critical Samkara scholarship in the second half of the twentieth century has been Paul Hacker, "Eigentumlichkeiten der Lehre und Terminologie Sankaras: Avidya, Namarupa, Maya, Isvara," "Zeitschrift der Deutschen Morgenlandischen Gesellschaft, vol.
41 describes jiva as in avidya and blinded by avidya, and so it sees indiscriminately and thus participates in the world as agent and experiencer.