axes of inertia

axes of inertia

[′ak‚sēz əv in′ər·shə]
(physics)
The three principal axes of inertia, namely, one about which the moment of inertia is a maximum, one about which the moment of inertia is a minimum, and one perpendicular to both.
References in periodicals archive ?
Central to Foote's discovery is a centuries-old, fundamental engineering concept called the "principal axes of inertia," a mathematical construct used to describe an object's three-dimensional properties.
When Foote examined the principal axes of inertia in a wide variety of protein structures, he found their axes intersected areas that are most critical for biological function, from antigen-binding sites of antibodies to the catalytic sites of enzymes.
It narrows down the search before you even begin," says Foote, who also found a strong correlation between axes of inertia and molecular regions used to bind DNA, protease inhibitors and virus proteins.