axillary

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Related to axillary lymph node: axillary lymph node dissection, Sentinel lymph node

axillary

[′ak·sə‚ler·ē]
(anatomy)
Of, pertaining to, or near the axilla or armpit.
(botany)
Placed or growing in the axis of a branch or leaf.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intramammary or axillary lymph node enlargement can also occur, and ill-defined or spiculated nodal margins show a significant association with malignancy (2).
Axillary lymph node metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma: report of a case.
A thorough history taking, physical examination, FNAC of the palpable axillary lymph node, Chest X-ray, ultrasound of the abdomen, screening blood work, mammogram and /or Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast are sufficient as the recommended investigations for locating potential sites of primary carcinoma.
A gallium scan was consistent with uptake in an area overlying the left breast, anterior chest wall and markedly enlarged left axillary lymph nodes.
The poster will highlight new clinical data from researchers at the University of Chicago on the role of PEM for assessment of axillary lymph node status in patients with breast cancer.
The findings from Z0011 document the high rate of locoregional control achieved with modern multimodal therapy, even without axillary lymph node dissection," said Dr.
Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) has been part of breast cancer surgery since the use of radical mastectomy and reliably identifies nodal metastases.
18 FDG-PET [2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography] scanning is ar imaging modality that has been adopted as a means of staging the whole body in patients with various malignancies, and there has been some interest in its use for assessing axillary lymph node status in breast cancer.
Regardless of whether you choose lumpectomy or mastectomy, an axillary lymph node dissection should be performed for invasive forms of the disease.
Myth: Axillary lymph node dissection is essential even in patients without palpable nodes.
Compared to total axillary lymph node dissection and radical mastectomies, the SLN biopsy has been successful in removing much of the trauma and many of the complications for the patient.
Because the incidence of lymph node metastases is related to tumor size, for small tumors the value of routine axillary lymph node dissection, in consideration of the possibility of overtreatment and consequent morbidity, is a matter of much debate (21-23).