axonometric projection

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axonometric projection

[¦ak·sə·nō¦me·trik prə′jek·shən]
(graphic arts)
A drawing that shows an object's inclined position with respect to the planes of projection. Also known as isometric projection.

axonometric projection

The orthographic projection of a three-dimensional object inclined to the picture plane in such a way that its three principal axes can be drawn to scale but diagonal and curved lines appear distorted.
See also: Projection drawing

axonometric projection

A form of orthographic projection in which a rectangular object, projected on a plane, shows three faces. One of two general divisions of pictorial projection (the other being oblique projection); often divided into three types: isometric, dimetric and trimetric.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether on the walls or discrete panels, Thorsen played here with the builder's chalk line, a tool conventionally used to plot structure in space with simple precision, and so a fascinating one for axonometric studies.
Was axonometric drawing simply a tool that allowed him to pursue his vision more readily?
3 gives an axonometric presentation of basis function [Fup.
This technique allows Aronson to hold onto a sense of normative viewing, whereas the axonometric projection into four directions leads to distortion.
The Fifth Edition also features more axonometric detail drawings and revised photographs for a thoroughly illustrated approach and the latest IBC 2006, CSI MasterFormat, ASTM references, and LEED information.
No longer representing axonometric space, the work is intended as a diagram for the imagination of a 103-year-old woman, who has assigned a memory to each door only to gradually forget them all.
Her own desire to show 'more than was visible' resulted in the invention or employment of advanced drawing techniques: the X-ray, the exploded axonometric, and the display of multiple, at times impossible, views simultaneously.
Ann Huppert identifies an "empirical" approach in Peruzzi's drawings from Terracina that is very different from the idealized reconstructions of Raphael and his followers, while Pierre Gros notes Peruzzi's exceptional precision in his systematic use of axonometric drawings and ancient Roman dimensions.
Even at Krabbesholm, you see students learning specific skills that they or their teachers seem to think they will need to continue their education in a particular field, to get into graduate school--the graphic design students put everything on a grid, or the architects all use computer models to generate axonometric drawings.
Canham's photos and Wu's axonometric drawings treat these 'illegal' structures with respect, bringing them into architectural discourse.