babaco


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babaco

1. a subtropical parthenocarpic tree, Carica pentagona, originating in South America, cultivated for its fruit: family Caricaceae
2. the greenish-yellow egg-shaped fruit of this tree, having a delicate fragrance and no pips
References in periodicals archive ?
The cooperation between LoJack SCI and Babaco will involve the development and release of a number of service offerings that leverage core features from both companies to create a one-stop, full service solution for assets and cargo in transit.
We are proud to be aligned and partnered with Babaco, given their rock solid reputation for providing proven, comprehensive products for vehicles.
The full range of Babaco Patented and propriety Commercial Security lock and alarm products have long been the gold standard in protection to ensure that customer's commercial vehicles are secure and guarded with local alarm system capabilities.
The end result offers a cost-effective, turnkey solution to the supply chain industry," stated Greg Haber, President, Babaco.
The branches that did have physical security had an electronic article surveillance (EAS) system using magnetics detection that Babaco said was considered dated among library circles.
According to Babaco, the new system cost approximately $3,000 (excluding installation), whereas other branches using the simpler magnetics solutions had paid nearly $5,000 for their systems.
However, with 23,327 registered borrowers at the branch and well over 50,000 library materials changing hands each month, Babaco wanted to adopt a different strategy.
The materials that 'walk' are the things that have a high street value or things that are high in demand," Babaco says.
Since babacos are grown in climate-controlled greenhouses, they are available sporadically year-round, but at this point production is small.
Whirl 1-1/4 cups peeled, seeded, and coarsely chopped babaco (about 1 fruit) with 1/2 tablespoon lemon juice until smoothly pureed.
Included for (first in the USA) introduction are: Pitavia from Columbia; Feijoa from Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina; Naranguilla and Jackfruit from Brazil, and Babaco from Ecuador.