Bacchus

(redirected from bacchic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Bacchus

(băk`əs), in Roman religion and mythology, god of wine; in Greek mythology, DionysusDionysus
, in Greek religion and mythology, god of fertility and wine. Legends concerning him are profuse and contradictory. However, he was one of the most important gods of the Greeks and was associated with various religious cults. He was probably in origin a Thracian deity.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Dionysus was also the god of tillage and law giving. He was worshiped at Delphi and at the spring festival, the Great Dionysia. In Rome, the mysteries of his cult were closely guarded, and he was identified with an ancient god of wine, Liber Pater. Many legends connected with Dionysus were also used in the cult of Bacchus.
Enlarge picture
A seventeenth-century engraving of a drunken Bacchus supported by two fauns. Reproduced by permission of Fortean Picture Library.

Bacchus

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Bacchus is asteroid 2,063 (the 2,063rd asteroid to be discovered, on April 24, 1977). It is approximately 1.2 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 1.1 years. Bacchus was named after the god of wine, the Roman equivalent of the Greek Dionysus. According to Martha Lang-Wescott, Bacchus is related to addictive syndrome, particularly to the denial, substitution, and management of uncomfortable emotions. This asteroid’s key word is “denial.” According to J. Lee Lehman, “Bacchus represents the way that a person seeks ecstasy through direct experience or passion.” Jacob Schwartz gives the astrological significance of this asteroid as “Ecstasy to encourage sensual excess and fertility; addictive personalities and behaviors and attempts to manage feelings through substitutions.”

Bacchus is also one of the names given to the hypothetical planet that some astrologers assert is orbiting beyond Pluto.

Sources:

Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford, 1988.
Lang-Wescott, Martha. Asteroids-Mechanics: Ephemerides II. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1990.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Bacchus

god of this season. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 130]
See: Autumn

Bacchus

(Gk. Dionysus) god of wine; honored by Bacchanalias. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 83]

Bacchus

god of wine. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 37, 142]
See: Wine

Bacchus

(in ancient Greece and Rome) a god of wine and giver of ecstasy, identified with Dionysus
References in periodicals archive ?
Set on the eve of the Battle of Actium, the poem dramatizes Antony's and Cleopatra's Bacchic outburst preceding their ultimate doom.
Poets] are not in their right minds when they compose these beautiful lyrics, but as soon as they sail into harmony and rhythm they are possessed by Bacchic frenzy.
Athamas and Ino, actually driven mad by the snakes of the Fury set upon them by jealous Juno (who is, as often, a useful narrative instrument), suffer the same fate as Pentheus whose mother and aunts in the Bacchic trance tore him apart.
10) In Act One, the rent boys Lucio and Antonio re-enact the sensuality of the Bacchic portraits that Caravaggio had created as a young man and drape themselves with the fruit and vines that were accoutrements of these works.
During the second and first century BCE, gem artists typically reduced representations of the bacchic thiasos to studies of individual figures.
Among the topics are thinking with commonplaces in Rabelais, Ronsard's Bacchic fresco, imagining skepticism in the 16th century, and towards a pre-history of suspense.
In the former, the reader receives a methodical introduction to the major mystery cults (Eleusinian, Samothracian, Bacchic, the cult of the Meter, Mithraic, Isiac) and the various modes in which they have been interpreted.
In Bacchic, Tamsin Shasha, the company's artistic director and co-founder, has sought to reinterprete the story of Dionysus for a contemporary audience.
Does the piece stage lesbian delight or Bacchic frenzy?
Is it the semi-deranged Bacchic priestesses swirling around us with incense, laurel wreaths and cackling madly as they pour salt on to the floor out of their Wellington boots?
the epidemic is an undeniable catalyst in the Bacchic passage that
Upon penetrating the Pavilion's main portal, visitors seeking Bacchic pleasures squeezed past a wine press "of impressive proportions" lit to create "an appropriate atmosphere" before descending "deep steps" into a capacious cellar 30 meters long and 15 meters wide.