backfire


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backfire

1. in an internal-combustion engine
a. an explosion of unburnt gases in the exhaust system
b. a premature explosion in a cylinder or inlet manifold
2. a controlled fire started to create a barren area that will halt an advancing forest or prairie fire

backfire

[′bak‚fīr]
(civil engineering)
A fire that is started in order to burn against and cut off a spreading fire.
(electronics)
(engineering)
Momentary backward burning of flame into the tip of a torch. Also known as flashback.
(mechanical engineering)
In an internal combustion engine, an improperly timed explosion of the fuel mixture in a cylinder, especially one occurring during the period that the exhaust or intake valve is open and resulting in a loud detonation.
(ordnance)
Rearward escapement of gases or cartridge fragments upon firing a gun.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is best about Backfire is its follow-through in updating the "fourth era" and linking it to the "fifth," largely by detailing the power and influence of the Southern Poverty Law Center and its controversial leader Morris Dees.
After flying over the Russian-held islands off the eastern coast of Hokkaido and moving further to the south, the Backfires then flew eastward into the airspace, this time at the altitude of 4,300 meters, between 2:36 p.
We are lucky to have Dan Lowe, his team at RED development, along with the owners of The Legends at Village West, the Honorable Mayor Joe Reardon and the Unified Government to thank for having Kansas City as the home of the first Backfire BBQ featuring Orange County Choppers.
Meanwhile, defense lawyers for Backfire defendant Stanislas Meyerhoff base their legal argument on the evolution of the law, its maze of revisions and varying terms that may exclude the Backfire defendants from its potentially harsh penalties.
Hogg's lawyer, Paul Loney of Portland, said Hogg apparently was named by cooperating defendants in the Backfire case who were making sentence deals.
I thought firstly that wasn't something that I wished to do and secondly, I actually believed that it would backfire and would probably deserve to backfire.
Attorney Kirk Engdall, a lead Backfire prosecutor, also declined to discuss the development.
He adds, however, that new technologies may backfire if people become overdependent on them.
Baruch Fischhoff, a psychologist and expert in risk communications at Carnegie Mellon University, says that communications will backfire if officials spin the truth because they think that employees will panic when given accurate information about a crisis.
A 14th defendant was indicted Wednesday in Eugene in Operation Backfire, the multistate federal investigation of arson by suspects who allegedly acted in the name of the Earth Liberation Front and the Animal Liberation Front over a six-year period.
However, such bluffs often backfire, she and colleagues report in the January Animal Behaviour.
This minimizes the exposure of hydrogen to hot surfaces -- in the presence of air -- and eliminates the backfire problem.