backlash


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backlash

1. a reaction or recoil between interacting worn or badly fitting parts in a mechanism
2. the play between parts

backlash

[′bak‚lash]
(design engineering)
The amount by which the tooth space of a gear exceeds the tooth thickness of the mating gear along the pitch circles.
(electronics)
A small reverse current in a rectifier tube caused by the motion of positive ions produced in the gas by the impact of thermoelectrons.
(engineering)
Relative motion of mechanical parts caused by looseness.
The difference between the actual values of a quantity when a dial controlling this quantity is brought to a given position by a clockwise rotation and when it is brought to the same position by a counterclockwise rotation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frank's argument, in a nutshell, is that you can't understand the backlash without thinking about class.
There are signs of a backlash among the youngest of historians, a return to history in the grand style reflected not only by this book but by Jeff Shesol's Mutual Contempt (about the LBJ-RFK feud), among others.
But you can bet there will be a backlash in a few months from now,' he said.
As 2005 kicked off, media pundits were delivering stark warnings of an impending consumer backlash.
WASPS flanker Johnny O'Connor has warned Australia they are facing an Irish backlash at Lansdowne Road tomorrow.
According to The Wall Street Journal, the public and political reaction has begun to worry city planning officials, who "are growing increasingly concerned that the backlash will block more projects, potentially causing big losses for developers and canceling long-planned projects.
Exclusively from HD Systems, the Harmonic Planetary[R] HPG Series provides the motion control and design engineer with a planetary gearhead that reduces backlash to less than 1 arc-min.
Theodore Dwight Bozeman, The precisianist strain: disciplinary religion and Antinomian backlash in Puritanism to 1638, 2004, $82.
E reported last March on a recent study by the National Recycling Coalition that said the recent backlash against recycling in New York City and elsewhere was the result of poor consumer education and mismanaged waste removal systems (see Currents, "Growing Pains").
In the anti-German backlash during World War I, sauerkraut became "liberty cabbage"; dachshunds were known as "liberty pups"; and some Americans changed their German-sounding names.
An Iraqi backlash against the looters who have ripped Basra apart could mean more violence on the city's streets, British military officials warned yesterday.
Another obvious source of backlash has been against the International Monetary Fund's ham-fisted conduct in Latin America and our overall inattention to what has been happening there.