backlog

(redirected from backlogs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.

backlog

[′bak‚läg]
(industrial engineering)
An accumulation of orders promising future work and profit.
An accumulation of unprocessed materials or unperformed tasks.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recommendation: To provide a realistic estimate of the government's fiscal exposure resulting from repair and maintenance backlogs and minimize the potential for duplicative reporting requirements, the Deputy Director for Management, Office of Management and Budget, in conjunction with the Federal Real Property Council (FRPC) and in consultation with Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB), should explore the potential for developing a uniform reporting requirement in the FRPP that would capture the government's fiscal exposure related to real property repair and maintenance.
LAPD officials said part of the reason the money has not been used yet is because it can take up to two years of training before criminologists can start working cases and addressing the backlog.
Commonly referred to as "backlog reductions," or more colloquially as "service triages" the ability to step in, assess, and quickly put into place an action plan to resolve backlogs is becoming more prevalent.
Even though claims backlogs have been studied before, Adm.
From the customer's perspective, backlogs frequently mean longer lead times, frustration, damaged supplier relationships and often result in business eventually being pulled from the offending foundry.
Today's backlog numbers are consistent with the pace of recovery in overall nonresidential construction activity," said ABC Chief Economist Anirban Basu.
After the Los Angeles Police Department's Rampart Division scandal, the city began requiring every police recruit to undergo a lie-detector test, but the LAPD does not have enough personnel to conduct the tests, leading to a backlog of 500 to 600 recruits in the application process.
Excessively small backlogs mean contractors are running low on available work and need to identify and secure additional sources of future revenues.
To prevent future backlogs, USCIS will rely on additional staffing reallocation and technology transformation.
Meissner pledged to achieve four milestones before any fees are increased: Reduce case backlogs and applicant wait time, open more than 100 Application Support Centers nationwide, implement a uniform mailing process for applications and install new software for them.
Companies with less than $30 million in revenue saw their respective backlogs increase 1.