backpack

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backpack

a pack carried on the back of an astronaut, containing oxygen cylinders, essential supplies, etc

backpack

A parachute pack attached to the parachute harness at the upper back of the wearer. A short term for backpack parachute.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rising participation in outdoor activities would boost the demand for outdoor backpacks during the forecast period.
With family homelessness at an all-time high, the organization's goal is to outfit 20,000 New York City children with backpacks in time for the first day of the school year.
Using the $500 she raised from selling the plants, Speese purchased backpacks and school supplies to donate.
DALO is considering a procurement of backpacks and carry on bag for soldiers for training and operational service national and international in warm as well as in cold climate zones.
David Wolffe said: "For years I've watched people take their backpacks off time and again to get something out, to move it out of the way on a crowded train or because they're worried about security.
Most physicians and physical therapists recommend that children carry no more than 10 percent to 15 percent of their body weight in the backpacks.
AS parents and their children prepare for re-opening of schools after the long summer recess, backpack safety should be put into consideration to prevent any injuries.
Pocket Aces Backpacks was founded at Indiana University to make high quality electronic charging backpacks for students, travelers and business professionals.
Select a backpack with two wide, padded shoulder straps to help distribute weight evenly over your child's shoulders and back.
Summary: Backpacks and their relation to back and neck pain in children
The school purchased the books for the backpacks, and the education department of the university purchased the backpacks and basic art materials (construction paper, markers, crayons, glue, etc.
While some sixth graders run around with backpacks full of snacks, toys or even 6 dare we say --schoolbooks, one 6th grade student in Michigan had a backpack full of money instead.